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Lipid lowering agents, cognitive decline, and dementia: the three-city study.
J Alzheimers Dis. 2012; 30(3):629-37.JA

Abstract

The aim of this prospective cohort study was to evaluate the effects of lipid lowering agent (LLA) intake on cognitive function in 6,830 community-dwelling elderly persons. Cognitive performance (global cognitive functioning, visual memory, verbal fluency, psychomotor speed, and executive function), clinical diagnosis of dementia, and fibrate and statin use, were evaluated at baseline, and 2, 4, and 7 year follow-up. Multivariate Cox models were stratified by gender and adjusted for sociodemographic characteristics, mental and physical health including vascular risk factors, and genetic vulnerability (apolipoprotein E and cholesteryl ester transfer protein). For women but not men, fibrate use was specifically associated with an increased risk over 7 years of decline in visual memory only (HR = 1.29, 95% CI = 1.09-1.54, p = 0.004), and did not increase risk for incident dementia. This association was independent of genetic vulnerability related to apolipoprotein E and cholesteryl exchange transfer protein polymorphisms and occurred only in women with higher low density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol levels and treated with fibrate (HR = 1.39, 95% CI = 1.08-1.79, p = 0.01) and not in those with lower LDL-cholesterol levels irrespective of fibrate treatment. For both genders, no significant associations were found between statins (irrespective of their lipophilicity) and either cognitive decline or dementia incidence. This prospective study, adjusting for multiple confounders, found no evidence that LLA given in late life reduced the risk of cognitive decline and dementia, but did raise the possibility that women with treatment-resistant high LDL-cholesterol may be at increased risk of decline in visual memory.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Inserm, U1061, Montpellier, France. marie-laure.ancelin@inserm.frNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22451317

Citation

Ancelin, Marie-Laure, et al. "Lipid Lowering Agents, Cognitive Decline, and Dementia: the Three-city Study." Journal of Alzheimer's Disease : JAD, vol. 30, no. 3, 2012, pp. 629-37.
Ancelin ML, Carrière I, Barberger-Gateau P, et al. Lipid lowering agents, cognitive decline, and dementia: the three-city study. J Alzheimers Dis. 2012;30(3):629-37.
Ancelin, M. L., Carrière, I., Barberger-Gateau, P., Auriacombe, S., Rouaud, O., Fourlanos, S., Berr, C., Dupuy, A. M., & Ritchie, K. (2012). Lipid lowering agents, cognitive decline, and dementia: the three-city study. Journal of Alzheimer's Disease : JAD, 30(3), 629-37. https://doi.org/10.3233/JAD-2012-120064
Ancelin ML, et al. Lipid Lowering Agents, Cognitive Decline, and Dementia: the Three-city Study. J Alzheimers Dis. 2012;30(3):629-37. PubMed PMID: 22451317.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Lipid lowering agents, cognitive decline, and dementia: the three-city study. AU - Ancelin,Marie-Laure, AU - Carrière,Isabelle, AU - Barberger-Gateau,Pascale, AU - Auriacombe,Sophie, AU - Rouaud,Olivier, AU - Fourlanos,Spiros, AU - Berr,Claudine, AU - Dupuy,Anne-Marie, AU - Ritchie,Karen, PY - 2012/3/28/entrez PY - 2012/3/28/pubmed PY - 2012/10/17/medline SP - 629 EP - 37 JF - Journal of Alzheimer's disease : JAD JO - J Alzheimers Dis VL - 30 IS - 3 N2 - The aim of this prospective cohort study was to evaluate the effects of lipid lowering agent (LLA) intake on cognitive function in 6,830 community-dwelling elderly persons. Cognitive performance (global cognitive functioning, visual memory, verbal fluency, psychomotor speed, and executive function), clinical diagnosis of dementia, and fibrate and statin use, were evaluated at baseline, and 2, 4, and 7 year follow-up. Multivariate Cox models were stratified by gender and adjusted for sociodemographic characteristics, mental and physical health including vascular risk factors, and genetic vulnerability (apolipoprotein E and cholesteryl ester transfer protein). For women but not men, fibrate use was specifically associated with an increased risk over 7 years of decline in visual memory only (HR = 1.29, 95% CI = 1.09-1.54, p = 0.004), and did not increase risk for incident dementia. This association was independent of genetic vulnerability related to apolipoprotein E and cholesteryl exchange transfer protein polymorphisms and occurred only in women with higher low density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol levels and treated with fibrate (HR = 1.39, 95% CI = 1.08-1.79, p = 0.01) and not in those with lower LDL-cholesterol levels irrespective of fibrate treatment. For both genders, no significant associations were found between statins (irrespective of their lipophilicity) and either cognitive decline or dementia incidence. This prospective study, adjusting for multiple confounders, found no evidence that LLA given in late life reduced the risk of cognitive decline and dementia, but did raise the possibility that women with treatment-resistant high LDL-cholesterol may be at increased risk of decline in visual memory. SN - 1875-8908 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22451317/Lipid_lowering_agents_cognitive_decline_and_dementia:_the_three_city_study_ L2 - https://content.iospress.com/openurl?genre=article&id=doi:10.3233/JAD-2012-120064 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -