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Obesity is not associated with increased mortality and morbidity in critically ill children.
JPEN J Parenter Enteral Nutr. 2013 Jan; 37(1):102-8.JJ

Abstract

AIM

To evaluate the effect of obesity on mortality, length of mechanical ventilation, and length of stay (LOS) in critically ill children.

METHODS

Retrospective cohort study in 2- to 18-year-olds, admitted to the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) at the Children's Hospital of Wisconsin from 2005-2009 who required invasive ventilation. Weight z score was used to categorize patients as normal (-1.89 to 1.04), overweight (1.05-1.65), obese (1.66-2.33), and severely obese (>2.33). Underweight patients were excluded. Age, gender, admission type, Pediatric Index of Mortality 2 score, operative status, trauma status, admission Pediatric Outcome Performance Category, and diagnosis categories were also collected. The outcomes were mortality, total ventilator days, and PICU LOS. Univariate analysis was used to compare the groups, and multivariate logistic regression was used to compare mortality. Total ventilation days and LOS were modeled with linear regression.

RESULTS

In total, 1030 patients were included in the study, with 753 normal weight, 137 overweight, 76 obese, and 64 severely obese. The risk-adjusted mortality rates in overweight (odds ratio [OR], 1.06; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.62-1.82), obese (OR, 0.68; 95% CI, 0.31-1.48), and severely obese patients (OR, 1.02; 95% CI, 0.45-2.34) were not significantly different compared with the normal-weight group. Total ventilation days (P = .9628) and PICU LOS (P = .8431) were not significantly different between the groups after adjusting for risk factors.

CONCLUSION

Critically ill overweight, obese, and severely obese children who require invasive mechanical ventilation have similar mortality, length of stay in the PICU, and ventilator days as compared with normal-weight children.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53226, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22457419

Citation

Goh, Vi Lier, et al. "Obesity Is Not Associated With Increased Mortality and Morbidity in Critically Ill Children." JPEN. Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition, vol. 37, no. 1, 2013, pp. 102-8.
Goh VL, Wakeham MK, Brazauskas R, et al. Obesity is not associated with increased mortality and morbidity in critically ill children. JPEN J Parenter Enteral Nutr. 2013;37(1):102-8.
Goh, V. L., Wakeham, M. K., Brazauskas, R., Mikhailov, T. A., & Goday, P. S. (2013). Obesity is not associated with increased mortality and morbidity in critically ill children. JPEN. Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition, 37(1), 102-8. https://doi.org/10.1177/0148607112441801
Goh VL, et al. Obesity Is Not Associated With Increased Mortality and Morbidity in Critically Ill Children. JPEN J Parenter Enteral Nutr. 2013;37(1):102-8. PubMed PMID: 22457419.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Obesity is not associated with increased mortality and morbidity in critically ill children. AU - Goh,Vi Lier, AU - Wakeham,Martin K, AU - Brazauskas,Ruta, AU - Mikhailov,Theresa A, AU - Goday,Praveen S, Y1 - 2012/03/28/ PY - 2012/3/30/entrez PY - 2012/3/30/pubmed PY - 2013/6/25/medline SP - 102 EP - 8 JF - JPEN. Journal of parenteral and enteral nutrition JO - JPEN J Parenter Enteral Nutr VL - 37 IS - 1 N2 - AIM: To evaluate the effect of obesity on mortality, length of mechanical ventilation, and length of stay (LOS) in critically ill children. METHODS: Retrospective cohort study in 2- to 18-year-olds, admitted to the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) at the Children's Hospital of Wisconsin from 2005-2009 who required invasive ventilation. Weight z score was used to categorize patients as normal (-1.89 to 1.04), overweight (1.05-1.65), obese (1.66-2.33), and severely obese (>2.33). Underweight patients were excluded. Age, gender, admission type, Pediatric Index of Mortality 2 score, operative status, trauma status, admission Pediatric Outcome Performance Category, and diagnosis categories were also collected. The outcomes were mortality, total ventilator days, and PICU LOS. Univariate analysis was used to compare the groups, and multivariate logistic regression was used to compare mortality. Total ventilation days and LOS were modeled with linear regression. RESULTS: In total, 1030 patients were included in the study, with 753 normal weight, 137 overweight, 76 obese, and 64 severely obese. The risk-adjusted mortality rates in overweight (odds ratio [OR], 1.06; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.62-1.82), obese (OR, 0.68; 95% CI, 0.31-1.48), and severely obese patients (OR, 1.02; 95% CI, 0.45-2.34) were not significantly different compared with the normal-weight group. Total ventilation days (P = .9628) and PICU LOS (P = .8431) were not significantly different between the groups after adjusting for risk factors. CONCLUSION: Critically ill overweight, obese, and severely obese children who require invasive mechanical ventilation have similar mortality, length of stay in the PICU, and ventilator days as compared with normal-weight children. SN - 1941-2444 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22457419/Obesity_is_not_associated_with_increased_mortality_and_morbidity_in_critically_ill_children_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1177/0148607112441801 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -