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Frontal plane biomechanics in males and females with and without patellofemoral pain.

Abstract

PURPOSE

The study's purpose was to compare trunk, pelvis, hip, and knee frontal plane biomechanics in males and females with and without patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS) during stepping.

METHODS

Eighty recreational athletes were equally divided into four groups: female PFPS, female controls, male PFPS, and male controls. Trunk, pelvis, hip, and knee frontal plane kinematics and activation of the gluteus medius were evaluated at 15°, 30°, 45°, and 60° of knee flexion during the downward and upward phases of the stepping task. Isometric hip abductor torque was also evaluated.

RESULTS

Females showed increased hip adduction and knee abduction at all knee flexion angles, greater ipsilateral trunk lean and contralateral pelvic drop from 60° of knee flexion till the end of the stepping task (P = 0.027-0.001), diminished hip abductor torque (P < 0.001), and increased gluteus medius activation than males (P = 0.008-0.001). PFPS subjects presented increased knee abduction at all the angles evaluated; greater trunk, pelvis, and hip motion from 45° of knee flexion of the downward phase till the end of the maneuver; and diminished gluteus medius activation at 60° of knee flexion, compared with controls (P = 0.034-0.001). Females with PFPS showed lower hip abductor torque compared with the other groups.

CONCLUSIONS

Females presented with altered frontal plane biomechanics that may predispose them to knee injury. PFPS subjects showed frontal plane biomechanics that could increase the lateral patellofemoral joint stress at all the angles evaluated and could increase even more from 45° of knee flexion in the downward phase until the end of the maneuver. Hip abductor strengthening and motor control training should be considered when treating females with PFPS.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department of Physical Therapy, Federal University of São Carlos, São Carlos, Brazil.

    , ,

    Source

    MeSH

    Adolescent
    Adult
    Athletes
    Biomechanical Phenomena
    Female
    Hip Joint
    Humans
    Knee Joint
    Male
    Muscle Strength
    Muscle, Skeletal
    Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome
    Sex Factors
    Surveys and Questionnaires
    Young Adult

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    22460471

    Citation

    Nakagawa, Theresa Helissa, et al. "Frontal Plane Biomechanics in Males and Females With and Without Patellofemoral Pain." Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, vol. 44, no. 9, 2012, pp. 1747-55.
    Nakagawa TH, Moriya ÉT, Maciel CD, et al. Frontal plane biomechanics in males and females with and without patellofemoral pain. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2012;44(9):1747-55.
    Nakagawa, T. H., Moriya, É. T., Maciel, C. D., & Serrão, A. F. (2012). Frontal plane biomechanics in males and females with and without patellofemoral pain. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 44(9), pp. 1747-55. doi:10.1249/MSS.0b013e318256903a.
    Nakagawa TH, et al. Frontal Plane Biomechanics in Males and Females With and Without Patellofemoral Pain. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2012;44(9):1747-55. PubMed PMID: 22460471.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Frontal plane biomechanics in males and females with and without patellofemoral pain. AU - Nakagawa,Theresa Helissa, AU - Moriya,Érika Tiemi Uehara, AU - Maciel,Carlos Dias, AU - Serrão,And Fábio Viadanna, PY - 2012/3/31/entrez PY - 2012/3/31/pubmed PY - 2013/6/12/medline SP - 1747 EP - 55 JF - Medicine and science in sports and exercise JO - Med Sci Sports Exerc VL - 44 IS - 9 N2 - PURPOSE: The study's purpose was to compare trunk, pelvis, hip, and knee frontal plane biomechanics in males and females with and without patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS) during stepping. METHODS: Eighty recreational athletes were equally divided into four groups: female PFPS, female controls, male PFPS, and male controls. Trunk, pelvis, hip, and knee frontal plane kinematics and activation of the gluteus medius were evaluated at 15°, 30°, 45°, and 60° of knee flexion during the downward and upward phases of the stepping task. Isometric hip abductor torque was also evaluated. RESULTS: Females showed increased hip adduction and knee abduction at all knee flexion angles, greater ipsilateral trunk lean and contralateral pelvic drop from 60° of knee flexion till the end of the stepping task (P = 0.027-0.001), diminished hip abductor torque (P < 0.001), and increased gluteus medius activation than males (P = 0.008-0.001). PFPS subjects presented increased knee abduction at all the angles evaluated; greater trunk, pelvis, and hip motion from 45° of knee flexion of the downward phase till the end of the maneuver; and diminished gluteus medius activation at 60° of knee flexion, compared with controls (P = 0.034-0.001). Females with PFPS showed lower hip abductor torque compared with the other groups. CONCLUSIONS: Females presented with altered frontal plane biomechanics that may predispose them to knee injury. PFPS subjects showed frontal plane biomechanics that could increase the lateral patellofemoral joint stress at all the angles evaluated and could increase even more from 45° of knee flexion in the downward phase until the end of the maneuver. Hip abductor strengthening and motor control training should be considered when treating females with PFPS. SN - 1530-0315 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22460471/Frontal_plane_biomechanics_in_males_and_females_with_and_without_patellofemoral_pain_ L2 - http://Insights.ovid.com/pubmed?pmid=22460471 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -