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Nutrient intake and risk of open-angle glaucoma: the Rotterdam Study.

Abstract

Open-angle glaucoma (OAG) is the commonest cause of irreversible blindness worldwide. Apart from an increased intraocular pressure (IOP), oxidative stress and an impaired ocular blood flow are supposed to contribute to OAG. The aim of this study was to determine whether the dietary intake of nutrients that either have anti-oxidative properties (carotenoids, vitamins, and flavonoids) or influence the blood flow (omega fatty acids and magnesium) is associated with incident OAG. We investigated this in a prospective population-based cohort, the Rotterdam Study. A total of 3502 participants aged 55 years and older for whom dietary data at baseline and ophthalmic data at baseline and follow-up were available and who did not have OAG at baseline were included. The ophthalmic examinations comprised measurements of the IOP and perimetry; dietary intake of nutrients was assessed by validated questionnaires and adjusted for energy intake. Cox proportional hazard regression analysis was applied to calculate hazard ratios of associations between the baseline intake of nutrients and incident OAG, adjusted for age, gender, IOP, IOP-lowering treatment, and body mass index. During an average follow-up of 9.7 years, 91 participants (2.6%) developed OAG. The hazard ratio for retinol equivalents (highest versus lowest tertile) was 0.45 (95% confidence interval 0.23-0.90), for vitamin B1 0.50 (0.25-0.98), and for magnesium 2.25 (1.16-4.38). The effects were stronger after the exclusion of participants taking supplements. Hence, a low intake of retinol equivalents and vitamin B1 (in line with hypothesis) and a high intake of magnesium (less unambiguous to interpret) appear to be associated with an increased risk of OAG.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department of Epidemiology, Erasmus Medical Center Rotterdam, PO Box 2040, 3000 CA Rotterdam, The Netherlands.

    , , , , ,

    Source

    European journal of epidemiology 27:5 2012 May pg 385-93

    MeSH

    Aged
    Aged, 80 and over
    Antioxidants
    Diet
    Diet Surveys
    Fatty Acids, Omega-3
    Female
    Follow-Up Studies
    Glaucoma, Open-Angle
    Humans
    Intraocular Pressure
    Linear Models
    Magnesium
    Male
    Middle Aged
    Netherlands
    Proportional Hazards Models
    Prospective Studies
    Surveys and Questionnaires
    Thiamine
    Vitamin A

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    22461101

    Citation

    Ramdas, Wishal D., et al. "Nutrient Intake and Risk of Open-angle Glaucoma: the Rotterdam Study." European Journal of Epidemiology, vol. 27, no. 5, 2012, pp. 385-93.
    Ramdas WD, Wolfs RC, Kiefte-de Jong JC, et al. Nutrient intake and risk of open-angle glaucoma: the Rotterdam Study. Eur J Epidemiol. 2012;27(5):385-93.
    Ramdas, W. D., Wolfs, R. C., Kiefte-de Jong, J. C., Hofman, A., de Jong, P. T., Vingerling, J. R., & Jansonius, N. M. (2012). Nutrient intake and risk of open-angle glaucoma: the Rotterdam Study. European Journal of Epidemiology, 27(5), pp. 385-93. doi:10.1007/s10654-012-9672-z.
    Ramdas WD, et al. Nutrient Intake and Risk of Open-angle Glaucoma: the Rotterdam Study. Eur J Epidemiol. 2012;27(5):385-93. PubMed PMID: 22461101.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Nutrient intake and risk of open-angle glaucoma: the Rotterdam Study. AU - Ramdas,Wishal D, AU - Wolfs,Roger C W, AU - Kiefte-de Jong,Jessica C, AU - Hofman,Albert, AU - de Jong,Paulus T V M, AU - Vingerling,Johannes R, AU - Jansonius,Nomdo M, Y1 - 2012/03/30/ PY - 2011/10/30/received PY - 2012/02/23/accepted PY - 2012/3/31/entrez PY - 2012/3/31/pubmed PY - 2012/10/16/medline SP - 385 EP - 93 JF - European journal of epidemiology JO - Eur. J. Epidemiol. VL - 27 IS - 5 N2 - Open-angle glaucoma (OAG) is the commonest cause of irreversible blindness worldwide. Apart from an increased intraocular pressure (IOP), oxidative stress and an impaired ocular blood flow are supposed to contribute to OAG. The aim of this study was to determine whether the dietary intake of nutrients that either have anti-oxidative properties (carotenoids, vitamins, and flavonoids) or influence the blood flow (omega fatty acids and magnesium) is associated with incident OAG. We investigated this in a prospective population-based cohort, the Rotterdam Study. A total of 3502 participants aged 55 years and older for whom dietary data at baseline and ophthalmic data at baseline and follow-up were available and who did not have OAG at baseline were included. The ophthalmic examinations comprised measurements of the IOP and perimetry; dietary intake of nutrients was assessed by validated questionnaires and adjusted for energy intake. Cox proportional hazard regression analysis was applied to calculate hazard ratios of associations between the baseline intake of nutrients and incident OAG, adjusted for age, gender, IOP, IOP-lowering treatment, and body mass index. During an average follow-up of 9.7 years, 91 participants (2.6%) developed OAG. The hazard ratio for retinol equivalents (highest versus lowest tertile) was 0.45 (95% confidence interval 0.23-0.90), for vitamin B1 0.50 (0.25-0.98), and for magnesium 2.25 (1.16-4.38). The effects were stronger after the exclusion of participants taking supplements. Hence, a low intake of retinol equivalents and vitamin B1 (in line with hypothesis) and a high intake of magnesium (less unambiguous to interpret) appear to be associated with an increased risk of OAG. SN - 1573-7284 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22461101/full_citation L2 - https://doi.org/10.1007/s10654-012-9672-z DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -