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Longitudinal vitamin D status in pregnancy and the risk of pre-eclampsia.
BJOG. 2012 Jun; 119(7):832-9.BJOG

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Whether vitamin D deficiency in pregnancy is a cause of pre-eclampsia remains controversial. Most previous studies to date have assessed exposure at only one time-point in pregnancy. We assessed longitudinal vitamin D status during pregnancy and the risk of pre-eclampsia.

DESIGN

Prospective cohort study.

SETTING

Seventeen urban obstetric hospitals, Canada.

POPULATION

Pregnant women who were participants in a trial of vitamin C and E supplementation for the prevention of pre-eclampsia. Canadian participants who consented to participate in a biobank with plasma specimens available at the baseline visit were included (n = 697).

METHODS

Maternal plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) concentrations were measured at 12-18 and 24-26 weeks of gestation using chemiluminescence immunoassay.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES

Pre-eclampsia.

RESULTS

Of the women, 39% were vitamin D deficient (25(OH)D <50 nmol/l). A strong positive correlation was observed in maternal 25(OH)D concentrations between the two gestational age windows (r = 0.69, P < 0.0001). Mean maternal 25(OH)D concentrations at 24-26 weeks of gestation were significantly lower in women who subsequently developed pre-eclampsia compared with those who did not (mean ± SD: 48.9 ± 16.8 versus 57.0 ± 19.1 nmol/l, P = 0.03). Women with 25(OH)D < 50 nmol/l at 24-26 weeks gestation experienced an increased risk of pre-eclampsia (adjusted odds ratio 3.24, 95% confidence interval 1.37-7.69), whereas the association was not statistically significant for maternal 25(OH)D level at 12-18 weeks of gestation.

CONCLUSIONS

Lower maternal 25(OH)D levels at late mid-trimester were associated with an increased risk of pre-eclampsia.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Sainte-Justine Hospital, University of Montreal, QC, Canada. shu.qin.wei@umontreal.caNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22462640

Citation

Wei, S Q., et al. "Longitudinal Vitamin D Status in Pregnancy and the Risk of Pre-eclampsia." BJOG : an International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, vol. 119, no. 7, 2012, pp. 832-9.
Wei SQ, Audibert F, Hidiroglou N, et al. Longitudinal vitamin D status in pregnancy and the risk of pre-eclampsia. BJOG. 2012;119(7):832-9.
Wei, S. Q., Audibert, F., Hidiroglou, N., Sarafin, K., Julien, P., Wu, Y., Luo, Z. C., & Fraser, W. D. (2012). Longitudinal vitamin D status in pregnancy and the risk of pre-eclampsia. BJOG : an International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, 119(7), 832-9. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1471-0528.2012.03307.x
Wei SQ, et al. Longitudinal Vitamin D Status in Pregnancy and the Risk of Pre-eclampsia. BJOG. 2012;119(7):832-9. PubMed PMID: 22462640.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Longitudinal vitamin D status in pregnancy and the risk of pre-eclampsia. AU - Wei,S Q, AU - Audibert,F, AU - Hidiroglou,N, AU - Sarafin,K, AU - Julien,P, AU - Wu,Y, AU - Luo,Z C, AU - Fraser,W D, Y1 - 2012/03/29/ PY - 2012/4/3/entrez PY - 2012/4/3/pubmed PY - 2012/7/28/medline SP - 832 EP - 9 JF - BJOG : an international journal of obstetrics and gynaecology JO - BJOG VL - 119 IS - 7 N2 - OBJECTIVE: Whether vitamin D deficiency in pregnancy is a cause of pre-eclampsia remains controversial. Most previous studies to date have assessed exposure at only one time-point in pregnancy. We assessed longitudinal vitamin D status during pregnancy and the risk of pre-eclampsia. DESIGN: Prospective cohort study. SETTING: Seventeen urban obstetric hospitals, Canada. POPULATION: Pregnant women who were participants in a trial of vitamin C and E supplementation for the prevention of pre-eclampsia. Canadian participants who consented to participate in a biobank with plasma specimens available at the baseline visit were included (n = 697). METHODS: Maternal plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) concentrations were measured at 12-18 and 24-26 weeks of gestation using chemiluminescence immunoassay. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Pre-eclampsia. RESULTS: Of the women, 39% were vitamin D deficient (25(OH)D <50 nmol/l). A strong positive correlation was observed in maternal 25(OH)D concentrations between the two gestational age windows (r = 0.69, P < 0.0001). Mean maternal 25(OH)D concentrations at 24-26 weeks of gestation were significantly lower in women who subsequently developed pre-eclampsia compared with those who did not (mean ± SD: 48.9 ± 16.8 versus 57.0 ± 19.1 nmol/l, P = 0.03). Women with 25(OH)D < 50 nmol/l at 24-26 weeks gestation experienced an increased risk of pre-eclampsia (adjusted odds ratio 3.24, 95% confidence interval 1.37-7.69), whereas the association was not statistically significant for maternal 25(OH)D level at 12-18 weeks of gestation. CONCLUSIONS: Lower maternal 25(OH)D levels at late mid-trimester were associated with an increased risk of pre-eclampsia. SN - 1471-0528 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22462640/Longitudinal_vitamin_D_status_in_pregnancy_and_the_risk_of_pre_eclampsia_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1471-0528.2012.03307.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -