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Baroreflex sensitivity during rest and executive functioning in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. The TRAILS study.
Biol Psychol. 2012 Jul; 90(3):249-57.BP

Abstract

Children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) often show executive function (EF) problems and neurophysiological hypoarousal. Baroreceptor activation, as part of the baroreflex short-term blood pressure regulatory mechanism, has been linked to cortical inhibition and attenuated cognitive-attentional functioning. We investigated the hypothesis that higher resting baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) predicts poorer EF performance in children with ADHD. EF measures of speed and accuracy were regressed upon resting BRS in 10-12-year-old children with ADHD from a clinic-referred sample (n=181) and healthy (n=194) and clinic-referred (n=260) comparison samples. Resting BRS was positively associated with poorer EF performance (e.g., response variability, working memory, response inhibition), especially in ADHD combined type, boys, and unmedicated children. Comparison samples partly suggested negative associations. We conclude that higher resting BRS is related to poorer cognitive performance in children with ADHD. Findings suggest afferent influences of the body's visceral state on higher-order cognitive functioning and imply energetic state dysregulation in ADHD.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, The Netherlands. A.Dietrich@accare.nlNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22465070

Citation

Dietrich, Andrea, et al. "Baroreflex Sensitivity During Rest and Executive Functioning in Attention-deficit/hyperactivity Disorder. the TRAILS Study." Biological Psychology, vol. 90, no. 3, 2012, pp. 249-57.
Dietrich A, Althaus M, Hartman CA, et al. Baroreflex sensitivity during rest and executive functioning in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. The TRAILS study. Biol Psychol. 2012;90(3):249-57.
Dietrich, A., Althaus, M., Hartman, C. A., Buitelaar, J. K., Mindera, R. B., van den Hoofdakker, B. J., & Hoekstra, P. J. (2012). Baroreflex sensitivity during rest and executive functioning in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. The TRAILS study. Biological Psychology, 90(3), 249-57. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.biopsycho.2012.03.008
Dietrich A, et al. Baroreflex Sensitivity During Rest and Executive Functioning in Attention-deficit/hyperactivity Disorder. the TRAILS Study. Biol Psychol. 2012;90(3):249-57. PubMed PMID: 22465070.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Baroreflex sensitivity during rest and executive functioning in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. The TRAILS study. AU - Dietrich,Andrea, AU - Althaus,Monika, AU - Hartman,Catharina A, AU - Buitelaar,Jan K, AU - Mindera,Ruud B, AU - van den Hoofdakker,Barbara J, AU - Hoekstra,Pieter J, Y1 - 2012/03/20/ PY - 2011/08/05/received PY - 2012/03/09/revised PY - 2012/03/09/accepted PY - 2012/4/3/entrez PY - 2012/4/3/pubmed PY - 2012/10/12/medline SP - 249 EP - 57 JF - Biological psychology JO - Biol Psychol VL - 90 IS - 3 N2 - Children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) often show executive function (EF) problems and neurophysiological hypoarousal. Baroreceptor activation, as part of the baroreflex short-term blood pressure regulatory mechanism, has been linked to cortical inhibition and attenuated cognitive-attentional functioning. We investigated the hypothesis that higher resting baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) predicts poorer EF performance in children with ADHD. EF measures of speed and accuracy were regressed upon resting BRS in 10-12-year-old children with ADHD from a clinic-referred sample (n=181) and healthy (n=194) and clinic-referred (n=260) comparison samples. Resting BRS was positively associated with poorer EF performance (e.g., response variability, working memory, response inhibition), especially in ADHD combined type, boys, and unmedicated children. Comparison samples partly suggested negative associations. We conclude that higher resting BRS is related to poorer cognitive performance in children with ADHD. Findings suggest afferent influences of the body's visceral state on higher-order cognitive functioning and imply energetic state dysregulation in ADHD. SN - 1873-6246 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22465070/Baroreflex_sensitivity_during_rest_and_executive_functioning_in_attention_deficit/hyperactivity_disorder__The_TRAILS_study_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0301-0511(12)00070-1 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -