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Markedly different clustering of CVD risk factors in New Zealand Indian and European people but similar risk scores (PREDICT-14).
Aust N Z J Public Health. 2012 Apr; 36(2):141-4.AN

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To compare the cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk profiles of Indian and European patients from routine primary care assessments in the northern region of New Zealand.

METHOD

Anonymous CVD risk profiles were extracted from PREDICT (a web-based decision support program) for Indian and European patients aged 35-74 years. Linear regression models were used to obtain mean differences adjusted for age, gender and deprivation.

RESULTS

At recruitment, Indian participants (n=8,830) were younger than Europeans (n=47,091), in keeping with national guidelines that recommend earlier CVD risk assessment for Indians. Compared with Europeans, a greater proportion of Indian participants lived in areas of higher deprivation and had a two to four-fold greater burden of diabetes in all age groups. Indian participants had a significantly lower proportion of smokers and a lower mean systolic blood pressure. The respective cardiovascular risk factor profiles lead to similar age-adjusted Framingham five-year CVD risk scores.

CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS

National data sources indicate that there are higher rates of hospitalisations and deaths from CVD in Indians compared with Europeans. Our study found similar predicted CVD risk in these two populations despite markedly different clustering of risk factors, suggesting that the Framingham risk equation may underestimate risk in Indians. There is a need for better ethnicity coding to identify all South Asian ethnicities.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Section of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Auckland, New Zealand. laviniap@adhb.govt.nzNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22487348

Citation

Perumal, Lavinia, et al. "Markedly Different Clustering of CVD Risk Factors in New Zealand Indian and European People but Similar Risk Scores (PREDICT-14)." Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, vol. 36, no. 2, 2012, pp. 141-4.
Perumal L, Wells S, Ameratunga S, et al. Markedly different clustering of CVD risk factors in New Zealand Indian and European people but similar risk scores (PREDICT-14). Aust N Z J Public Health. 2012;36(2):141-4.
Perumal, L., Wells, S., Ameratunga, S., Pylypchuk, R. D., Elley, C. R., Riddell, T., Kerr, A., Crengle, S., Gentles, D., & Jackson, R. (2012). Markedly different clustering of CVD risk factors in New Zealand Indian and European people but similar risk scores (PREDICT-14). Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 36(2), 141-4. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1753-6405.2011.00808.x
Perumal L, et al. Markedly Different Clustering of CVD Risk Factors in New Zealand Indian and European People but Similar Risk Scores (PREDICT-14). Aust N Z J Public Health. 2012;36(2):141-4. PubMed PMID: 22487348.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Markedly different clustering of CVD risk factors in New Zealand Indian and European people but similar risk scores (PREDICT-14). AU - Perumal,Lavinia, AU - Wells,Susan, AU - Ameratunga,Shanthi, AU - Pylypchuk,Romana D, AU - Elley,C Raina, AU - Riddell,Tania, AU - Kerr,Andrew, AU - Crengle,Sue, AU - Gentles,Dudley, AU - Jackson,Rod, Y1 - 2012/01/02/ PY - 2012/4/11/entrez PY - 2012/4/11/pubmed PY - 2012/7/21/medline SP - 141 EP - 4 JF - Australian and New Zealand journal of public health JO - Aust N Z J Public Health VL - 36 IS - 2 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To compare the cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk profiles of Indian and European patients from routine primary care assessments in the northern region of New Zealand. METHOD: Anonymous CVD risk profiles were extracted from PREDICT (a web-based decision support program) for Indian and European patients aged 35-74 years. Linear regression models were used to obtain mean differences adjusted for age, gender and deprivation. RESULTS: At recruitment, Indian participants (n=8,830) were younger than Europeans (n=47,091), in keeping with national guidelines that recommend earlier CVD risk assessment for Indians. Compared with Europeans, a greater proportion of Indian participants lived in areas of higher deprivation and had a two to four-fold greater burden of diabetes in all age groups. Indian participants had a significantly lower proportion of smokers and a lower mean systolic blood pressure. The respective cardiovascular risk factor profiles lead to similar age-adjusted Framingham five-year CVD risk scores. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS: National data sources indicate that there are higher rates of hospitalisations and deaths from CVD in Indians compared with Europeans. Our study found similar predicted CVD risk in these two populations despite markedly different clustering of risk factors, suggesting that the Framingham risk equation may underestimate risk in Indians. There is a need for better ethnicity coding to identify all South Asian ethnicities. SN - 1753-6405 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22487348/Markedly_different_clustering_of_CVD_risk_factors_in_New_Zealand_Indian_and_European_people_but_similar_risk_scores__PREDICT_14__ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1753-6405.2011.00808.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -