Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

A cross-sectional study of US rural adults' consumption of fruits and vegetables: do they consume at least five servings daily?
BMC Public Health. 2012 Jun 01; 12:280.BP

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Rural residents are increasingly identified as being at greater risk for health disparities. These inequities may be related to health behaviors such as adequate fruits and vegetable consumption. There is little national-level population-based research about the prevalence of fruit and vegetable consumption by US rural population adults. The objective of this study was to examine the prevalence differences between US rural and non-rural adults in consuming at least five daily servings of combined fruits and vegetables.

METHODS

Cross-sectional analysis of weighted 2009 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance Survey (BRFSS) data using bivariate and multivariate techniques. 52,259,789 US adults were identified as consuming at least five daily servings of fruits and vegetables of which 8,983,840 were identified as living in rural locales.

RESULTS

Bivariate analysis revealed that in comparison to non-rural US adults, rural adults were less likely to consume five or more daily servings of fruits and vegetables (OR=1.161, 95% CI 1.160-1.162). Logistic regression analysis revealed that US rural adults consuming at least five daily servings of fruits and vegetables were more likely to be female, non-Caucasian, married or living with a partner, living in a household without children, living in a household whose annual income was > $35,000, and getting at least moderate physical activity. They were also more likely to have a BMI of <30, have a personal physician, have had a routine medical exam in the past 12 months, self-defined their health as good to excellent and to have deferred medical care because of cost. When comparing the prevalence differences between rural and non-rural US adults within a state, 37 States had a lower prevalence of rural adults consuming at least five daily servings of fruits and vegetables and 11 States a higher prevalence of the same.

CONCLUSIONS

This enhanced understanding of fruit and vegetable consumption should prove useful to those seeking to lessen the disparity or inequity between rural and non-rural adults. Additionally, those responsible for health-related planning could benefit from the knowledge of how their state ranks in comparison to others vis-à-vis the consumption of fruits and vegetables by rural adults---a population increasingly being identified as one at risk for health disparities.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Essentia Institute of Rural Health, Division of Research, 502 East 2nd Street, Duluth, MN, 55805, USA. mlutfiyya@eirh.orgNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22490063

Citation

Lutfiyya, M Nawal, et al. "A Cross-sectional Study of US Rural Adults' Consumption of Fruits and Vegetables: Do They Consume at Least Five Servings Daily?" BMC Public Health, vol. 12, 2012, p. 280.
Lutfiyya MN, Chang LF, Lipsky MS. A cross-sectional study of US rural adults' consumption of fruits and vegetables: do they consume at least five servings daily? BMC Public Health. 2012;12:280.
Lutfiyya, M. N., Chang, L. F., & Lipsky, M. S. (2012). A cross-sectional study of US rural adults' consumption of fruits and vegetables: do they consume at least five servings daily? BMC Public Health, 12, 280. https://doi.org/10.1186/1471-2458-12-280
Lutfiyya MN, Chang LF, Lipsky MS. A Cross-sectional Study of US Rural Adults' Consumption of Fruits and Vegetables: Do They Consume at Least Five Servings Daily. BMC Public Health. 2012 Jun 1;12:280. PubMed PMID: 22490063.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - A cross-sectional study of US rural adults' consumption of fruits and vegetables: do they consume at least five servings daily? AU - Lutfiyya,M Nawal, AU - Chang,Linda F, AU - Lipsky,Martin S, Y1 - 2012/06/01/ PY - 2011/09/19/received PY - 2012/04/10/accepted PY - 2012/4/12/entrez PY - 2012/4/12/pubmed PY - 2012/8/7/medline SP - 280 EP - 280 JF - BMC public health JO - BMC Public Health VL - 12 N2 - BACKGROUND: Rural residents are increasingly identified as being at greater risk for health disparities. These inequities may be related to health behaviors such as adequate fruits and vegetable consumption. There is little national-level population-based research about the prevalence of fruit and vegetable consumption by US rural population adults. The objective of this study was to examine the prevalence differences between US rural and non-rural adults in consuming at least five daily servings of combined fruits and vegetables. METHODS: Cross-sectional analysis of weighted 2009 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance Survey (BRFSS) data using bivariate and multivariate techniques. 52,259,789 US adults were identified as consuming at least five daily servings of fruits and vegetables of which 8,983,840 were identified as living in rural locales. RESULTS: Bivariate analysis revealed that in comparison to non-rural US adults, rural adults were less likely to consume five or more daily servings of fruits and vegetables (OR=1.161, 95% CI 1.160-1.162). Logistic regression analysis revealed that US rural adults consuming at least five daily servings of fruits and vegetables were more likely to be female, non-Caucasian, married or living with a partner, living in a household without children, living in a household whose annual income was > $35,000, and getting at least moderate physical activity. They were also more likely to have a BMI of <30, have a personal physician, have had a routine medical exam in the past 12 months, self-defined their health as good to excellent and to have deferred medical care because of cost. When comparing the prevalence differences between rural and non-rural US adults within a state, 37 States had a lower prevalence of rural adults consuming at least five daily servings of fruits and vegetables and 11 States a higher prevalence of the same. CONCLUSIONS: This enhanced understanding of fruit and vegetable consumption should prove useful to those seeking to lessen the disparity or inequity between rural and non-rural adults. Additionally, those responsible for health-related planning could benefit from the knowledge of how their state ranks in comparison to others vis-à-vis the consumption of fruits and vegetables by rural adults---a population increasingly being identified as one at risk for health disparities. SN - 1471-2458 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22490063/A_cross_sectional_study_of_US_rural_adults'_consumption_of_fruits_and_vegetables:_do_they_consume_at_least_five_servings_daily L2 - https://bmcpublichealth.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1471-2458-12-280 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -