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Compliance with antimalaria chemoprophylaxis in a combat zone.
Am J Trop Med Hyg 2012; 86(4):587-90AJ

Abstract

Compliance with malaria chemoprophylaxis by military service members (MSMs) is notoriously low, ranging from 30% to 56%. Our objective was to determine the rate of compliance and reasons for non-compliance with malaria chemoprophylaxis among healthy US MSMs in Afghanistan. An eight-question, anonymous online survey was used to collect data regarding the compliance of healthy MSMs with malaria chemoprophylaxis. E-mail surveys were sent to 1,200 MSMs; 528 (44%) MSMs completed the survey. One-time daily doxycycline was the most commonly prescribed chemoprophylaxis (90%); 60% (N = 318) responded that they were compliant with their chemoprophylaxis as prescribed, whereas 40% (N = 221) indicated that they were not compliant. Compliance with daily dosing was 61% and weekly dosing was 38%. The most common reasons for non-compliance were gastrointestinal effects (39%), forgetfulness (31%), and low perception of risk (24%). Malaria chemoprophylaxis compliance by healthy MSMs in Afghanistan is poor. Side effects, forgetfulness, and lack of education are contributing factors. Commanders bear the primary responsibility for the health of their soldiers, and the individual MSM bears personal responsibility; however, additional public health interventions could possibly have a positive impact on prevention.

Authors+Show Affiliations

C Company, Air Ambulance, General Support Aviation Battalion, 10th Combat Aviation Brigade, Fort Drum, New York, USA. mike.brisson@us.army.milNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22492140

Citation

Brisson, Michael, and Paul Brisson. "Compliance With Antimalaria Chemoprophylaxis in a Combat Zone." The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, vol. 86, no. 4, 2012, pp. 587-90.
Brisson M, Brisson P. Compliance with antimalaria chemoprophylaxis in a combat zone. Am J Trop Med Hyg. 2012;86(4):587-90.
Brisson, M., & Brisson, P. (2012). Compliance with antimalaria chemoprophylaxis in a combat zone. The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, 86(4), pp. 587-90. doi:10.4269/ajtmh.2012.11-0511.
Brisson M, Brisson P. Compliance With Antimalaria Chemoprophylaxis in a Combat Zone. Am J Trop Med Hyg. 2012;86(4):587-90. PubMed PMID: 22492140.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Compliance with antimalaria chemoprophylaxis in a combat zone. AU - Brisson,Michael, AU - Brisson,Paul, PY - 2012/4/12/entrez PY - 2012/4/12/pubmed PY - 2012/5/31/medline SP - 587 EP - 90 JF - The American journal of tropical medicine and hygiene JO - Am. J. Trop. Med. Hyg. VL - 86 IS - 4 N2 - Compliance with malaria chemoprophylaxis by military service members (MSMs) is notoriously low, ranging from 30% to 56%. Our objective was to determine the rate of compliance and reasons for non-compliance with malaria chemoprophylaxis among healthy US MSMs in Afghanistan. An eight-question, anonymous online survey was used to collect data regarding the compliance of healthy MSMs with malaria chemoprophylaxis. E-mail surveys were sent to 1,200 MSMs; 528 (44%) MSMs completed the survey. One-time daily doxycycline was the most commonly prescribed chemoprophylaxis (90%); 60% (N = 318) responded that they were compliant with their chemoprophylaxis as prescribed, whereas 40% (N = 221) indicated that they were not compliant. Compliance with daily dosing was 61% and weekly dosing was 38%. The most common reasons for non-compliance were gastrointestinal effects (39%), forgetfulness (31%), and low perception of risk (24%). Malaria chemoprophylaxis compliance by healthy MSMs in Afghanistan is poor. Side effects, forgetfulness, and lack of education are contributing factors. Commanders bear the primary responsibility for the health of their soldiers, and the individual MSM bears personal responsibility; however, additional public health interventions could possibly have a positive impact on prevention. SN - 1476-1645 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22492140/full_citation L2 - http://www.ajtmh.org/content/journals/10.4269/ajtmh.2012.11-0511?crawler=true&mimetype=application/pdf DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -