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Coronectomy of the lower third molar is safe within the first 3 years.

Abstract

PURPOSE

There is no long-term evaluation on the safety of coronectomy of the lower third molar. The aim of this study was to investigate the 3-year morbidity of coronectomy of the lower third molars and to monitor the behavior and migration pattern of the retained roots after coronectomy.

MATERIALS AND METHODS

This was a prospective cohort study. Patients with lower third molars with specific radiographic sign(s) showing proximity of the roots to the inferior alveolar nerve who underwent coronectomy in a previous randomized clinical trial were reviewed postoperatively in the first week and the third, sixth, 12th, 24th, and 36th months. The morbidities of infection, pain, root eruption, reoperation to remove the root, and the development of any pathology were recorded. The pattern of any root migration was analyzed.

RESULTS

Ninety-eight patients (35 men and 63 women; mean age, 25.7 yrs; standard deviation, 7.9 yrs) with 135 coronectomies completed the 36-month review. None presented with infection or pain from the postoperative third month onward. Root eruption causing sensitivity occurred in 3% (4/135) of the sample and the erupted roots were removed. None of the reoperated cases presented with a postoperative inferior alveolar nerve deficit. No pathology developed in any of the retained roots after coronectomy. Root migration was noted in most cases in the first 12 months, and all roots stopped migrating from the 24th month onward. The mean root migration at 36 months was 2.8 mm (standard deviation, 1.4 mm).

CONCLUSIONS

This study confirms that retained roots after coronectomy in the lower third molars produce no complications in terms of infection, pain, or the development of pathologies within the first 3 years. Root eruption can occur in a very small percentage of patients and may require reoperation to remove the root.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Discipline of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong.

    Source

    MeSH

    Adult
    Cohort Studies
    Female
    Follow-Up Studies
    Humans
    Male
    Mandible
    Mandibular Nerve
    Molar, Third
    Pain, Postoperative
    Prospective Studies
    Safety
    Surgical Wound Infection
    Tooth Crown
    Tooth Eruption
    Tooth Extraction
    Tooth Migration
    Tooth Root
    Tooth, Impacted
    Treatment Outcome

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    22494507

    Citation

    Leung, Yiu Yan, and Lim Kwong Cheung. "Coronectomy of the Lower Third Molar Is Safe Within the First 3 Years." Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery : Official Journal of the American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons, vol. 70, no. 7, 2012, pp. 1515-22.
    Leung YY, Cheung LK. Coronectomy of the lower third molar is safe within the first 3 years. J Oral Maxillofac Surg. 2012;70(7):1515-22.
    Leung, Y. Y., & Cheung, L. K. (2012). Coronectomy of the lower third molar is safe within the first 3 years. Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery : Official Journal of the American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons, 70(7), pp. 1515-22. doi:10.1016/j.joms.2011.12.029.
    Leung YY, Cheung LK. Coronectomy of the Lower Third Molar Is Safe Within the First 3 Years. J Oral Maxillofac Surg. 2012;70(7):1515-22. PubMed PMID: 22494507.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Coronectomy of the lower third molar is safe within the first 3 years. AU - Leung,Yiu Yan, AU - Cheung,Lim Kwong, Y1 - 2012/04/10/ PY - 2011/10/08/received PY - 2011/12/22/revised PY - 2011/12/23/accepted PY - 2012/4/13/entrez PY - 2012/4/13/pubmed PY - 2012/9/26/medline SP - 1515 EP - 22 JF - Journal of oral and maxillofacial surgery : official journal of the American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons JO - J. Oral Maxillofac. Surg. VL - 70 IS - 7 N2 - PURPOSE: There is no long-term evaluation on the safety of coronectomy of the lower third molar. The aim of this study was to investigate the 3-year morbidity of coronectomy of the lower third molars and to monitor the behavior and migration pattern of the retained roots after coronectomy. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This was a prospective cohort study. Patients with lower third molars with specific radiographic sign(s) showing proximity of the roots to the inferior alveolar nerve who underwent coronectomy in a previous randomized clinical trial were reviewed postoperatively in the first week and the third, sixth, 12th, 24th, and 36th months. The morbidities of infection, pain, root eruption, reoperation to remove the root, and the development of any pathology were recorded. The pattern of any root migration was analyzed. RESULTS: Ninety-eight patients (35 men and 63 women; mean age, 25.7 yrs; standard deviation, 7.9 yrs) with 135 coronectomies completed the 36-month review. None presented with infection or pain from the postoperative third month onward. Root eruption causing sensitivity occurred in 3% (4/135) of the sample and the erupted roots were removed. None of the reoperated cases presented with a postoperative inferior alveolar nerve deficit. No pathology developed in any of the retained roots after coronectomy. Root migration was noted in most cases in the first 12 months, and all roots stopped migrating from the 24th month onward. The mean root migration at 36 months was 2.8 mm (standard deviation, 1.4 mm). CONCLUSIONS: This study confirms that retained roots after coronectomy in the lower third molars produce no complications in terms of infection, pain, or the development of pathologies within the first 3 years. Root eruption can occur in a very small percentage of patients and may require reoperation to remove the root. SN - 1531-5053 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22494507/abstract/Coronectomy_of_the_Lower_Third_Molar_Is_Safe_Within_the_First_3_Years_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0278-2391(12)00002-X DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -