Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Antibodies cross-reactive to influenza A (H3N2) variant virus and impact of 2010-11 seasonal influenza vaccine on cross-reactive antibodies - United States.
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2012 Apr 13; 61(14):237-41.MM

Abstract

Since August 2011, a total of 12 human infections with influenza A (H3N2) variant viruses with genes from avian, swine, and human viruses (i.e., A [H3N2]v) that had acquired the M gene from influenza A (H1N1)pdm09 virus have been reported to CDC. Eleven of the cases occurred in children aged <10 years. In six cases, no history of recent exposure to swine was noted, suggesting that human-to-human transmission had occurred. This new gene constellation for A (H3N2)v viruses and its temporal association with an increase in human cases of A (H3N2)v highlight the need to better understand the risk for human infection with these viruses and the extent to which current seasonal vaccines might elicit cross-reactive antibodies to them. CDC conducted a preliminary analysis to evaluate the age-specific presence of serum cross-reactive antibody in U.S. populations vaccinated or not vaccinated with the 2010-11 seasonal trivalent influenza vaccine (TIV). The results indicated that 1) little or no cross-reactive antibody to A (H3N2)v exists among children aged <10 years, 2) immunization with the 2010-11 TIV had no impact on cross-reactive antibody levels in those aged <3 years, 3) cross-reactive antibody was detected in 20%-30% of those aged ≥10 years, and 4) among adults, vaccination with TIV provided a modest boost to the level of cross-reactive A (H3N2)v antibodies. Receipt of seasonal influenza vaccine continues to be recommended to protect against circulating human influenza viruses for all age groups and might provide limited protection against A (H3N2)v infection in the adult population. A vaccine virus specific for A (H3N2)v has been developed and could be used to produce an H3N2v vaccine, if needed.

Authors

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22495226

Citation

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). "Antibodies Cross-reactive to Influenza a (H3N2) Variant Virus and Impact of 2010-11 Seasonal Influenza Vaccine On Cross-reactive Antibodies - United States." MMWR. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, vol. 61, no. 14, 2012, pp. 237-41.
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Antibodies cross-reactive to influenza A (H3N2) variant virus and impact of 2010-11 seasonal influenza vaccine on cross-reactive antibodies - United States. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2012;61(14):237-41.
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). (2012). Antibodies cross-reactive to influenza A (H3N2) variant virus and impact of 2010-11 seasonal influenza vaccine on cross-reactive antibodies - United States. MMWR. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, 61(14), 237-41.
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Antibodies Cross-reactive to Influenza a (H3N2) Variant Virus and Impact of 2010-11 Seasonal Influenza Vaccine On Cross-reactive Antibodies - United States. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2012 Apr 13;61(14):237-41. PubMed PMID: 22495226.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Antibodies cross-reactive to influenza A (H3N2) variant virus and impact of 2010-11 seasonal influenza vaccine on cross-reactive antibodies - United States. A1 - ,, PY - 2012/4/13/entrez PY - 2012/4/13/pubmed PY - 2012/5/23/medline SP - 237 EP - 41 JF - MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report JO - MMWR Morb. Mortal. Wkly. Rep. VL - 61 IS - 14 N2 - Since August 2011, a total of 12 human infections with influenza A (H3N2) variant viruses with genes from avian, swine, and human viruses (i.e., A [H3N2]v) that had acquired the M gene from influenza A (H1N1)pdm09 virus have been reported to CDC. Eleven of the cases occurred in children aged <10 years. In six cases, no history of recent exposure to swine was noted, suggesting that human-to-human transmission had occurred. This new gene constellation for A (H3N2)v viruses and its temporal association with an increase in human cases of A (H3N2)v highlight the need to better understand the risk for human infection with these viruses and the extent to which current seasonal vaccines might elicit cross-reactive antibodies to them. CDC conducted a preliminary analysis to evaluate the age-specific presence of serum cross-reactive antibody in U.S. populations vaccinated or not vaccinated with the 2010-11 seasonal trivalent influenza vaccine (TIV). The results indicated that 1) little or no cross-reactive antibody to A (H3N2)v exists among children aged <10 years, 2) immunization with the 2010-11 TIV had no impact on cross-reactive antibody levels in those aged <3 years, 3) cross-reactive antibody was detected in 20%-30% of those aged ≥10 years, and 4) among adults, vaccination with TIV provided a modest boost to the level of cross-reactive A (H3N2)v antibodies. Receipt of seasonal influenza vaccine continues to be recommended to protect against circulating human influenza viruses for all age groups and might provide limited protection against A (H3N2)v infection in the adult population. A vaccine virus specific for A (H3N2)v has been developed and could be used to produce an H3N2v vaccine, if needed. SN - 1545-861X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22495226/Antibodies_cross_reactive_to_influenza_A__H3N2__variant_virus_and_impact_of_2010_11_seasonal_influenza_vaccine_on_cross_reactive_antibodies___United_States_ L2 - https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm6114a1.htm DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -