Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Higher vitamin D dietary intake is associated with lower risk of alzheimer's disease: a 7-year follow-up.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Hypovitaminosis D is associated with cognitive decline among older adults. The relationship between vitamin D intakes and cognitive decline is not well understood. Our objective was to determine whether the dietary intake of vitamin D was an independent predictor of the onset of dementia within 7 years among women aged 75 years and older.

METHODS

Four hundred and ninety-eight community-dwelling women (mean, 79.8 ± 3.8 years) free of vitamin D supplements from the EPIDemiology of OSteoporosis Toulouse cohort study were divided into three groups according to the onset of dementia within 7 years (ie, no dementia, Alzheimer's disease [AD], or other dementias). Baseline vitamin D dietary intakes were estimated from self-administered food frequency questionnaire. Age, body mass index, initial cognitive performance, education level, physical activity, sun exposure, disability, number of chronic diseases, hypertension, depression, use of psychoactive drugs, and baseline season were considered as potential confounders.

RESULTS

Women who developed AD (n = 70) had lower baseline vitamin D intakes (mean, 50.3 ± 19.3 μg/wk) than nondemented (n = 361; mean intake = 59.0 ± 29.9 μg/wk, p = .027) or those who developed other dementias (n = 67; mean intake = 63.6 ± 38.1 μg/wk, p = .010). There was no difference between other dementias and no dementia (p = .247). Baseline vitamin D dietary intakes were associated with the onset of AD (adjusted odds ratio = 0.99 [95% confidence interval = 0.98-0.99], p = .041) but not with other dementias (p = .071). Being in the highest quintile of vitamin D dietary intakes was associated with a lower risk of AD compared with the lower 4 quintiles combined (adjusted odds ratio = 0.23 [95% confidence interval = 0.08-0.67], p = .007).

CONCLUSIONS

Higher vitamin D dietary intake was associated with a lower risk of developing AD among older women.

Links

  • Publisher Full Text
  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department of Neuroscience, Division of Geriatric Medicine, Angers University Hospital, 49933 Angers, France. ceannweiler@chu-angers.fr

    , , , , ,

    Source

    MeSH

    Age Distribution
    Aged
    Aged, 80 and over
    Alzheimer Disease
    Anthropometry
    Body Mass Index
    Chi-Square Distribution
    Cognition Disorders
    Cohort Studies
    Dietary Supplements
    Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
    Drug Administration Schedule
    Female
    Follow-Up Studies
    Humans
    Incidence
    Logistic Models
    Neuropsychological Tests
    Prospective Studies
    Risk Assessment
    Time Factors
    Vitamin D

    Pub Type(s)

    Comparative Study
    Journal Article
    Multicenter Study
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    22503994

    Citation

    Annweiler, Cédric, et al. "Higher Vitamin D Dietary Intake Is Associated With Lower Risk of Alzheimer's Disease: a 7-year Follow-up." The Journals of Gerontology. Series A, Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences, vol. 67, no. 11, 2012, pp. 1205-11.
    Annweiler C, Rolland Y, Schott AM, et al. Higher vitamin D dietary intake is associated with lower risk of alzheimer's disease: a 7-year follow-up. J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2012;67(11):1205-11.
    Annweiler, C., Rolland, Y., Schott, A. M., Blain, H., Vellas, B., Herrmann, F. R., & Beauchet, O. (2012). Higher vitamin D dietary intake is associated with lower risk of alzheimer's disease: a 7-year follow-up. The Journals of Gerontology. Series A, Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences, 67(11), pp. 1205-11. doi:10.1093/gerona/gls107.
    Annweiler C, et al. Higher Vitamin D Dietary Intake Is Associated With Lower Risk of Alzheimer's Disease: a 7-year Follow-up. J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2012;67(11):1205-11. PubMed PMID: 22503994.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Higher vitamin D dietary intake is associated with lower risk of alzheimer's disease: a 7-year follow-up. AU - Annweiler,Cédric, AU - Rolland,Yves, AU - Schott,Anne M, AU - Blain,Hubert, AU - Vellas,Bruno, AU - Herrmann,François R, AU - Beauchet,Olivier, Y1 - 2012/04/13/ PY - 2012/4/17/entrez PY - 2012/4/17/pubmed PY - 2013/1/11/medline SP - 1205 EP - 11 JF - The journals of gerontology. Series A, Biological sciences and medical sciences JO - J. Gerontol. A Biol. Sci. Med. Sci. VL - 67 IS - 11 N2 - BACKGROUND: Hypovitaminosis D is associated with cognitive decline among older adults. The relationship between vitamin D intakes and cognitive decline is not well understood. Our objective was to determine whether the dietary intake of vitamin D was an independent predictor of the onset of dementia within 7 years among women aged 75 years and older. METHODS: Four hundred and ninety-eight community-dwelling women (mean, 79.8 ± 3.8 years) free of vitamin D supplements from the EPIDemiology of OSteoporosis Toulouse cohort study were divided into three groups according to the onset of dementia within 7 years (ie, no dementia, Alzheimer's disease [AD], or other dementias). Baseline vitamin D dietary intakes were estimated from self-administered food frequency questionnaire. Age, body mass index, initial cognitive performance, education level, physical activity, sun exposure, disability, number of chronic diseases, hypertension, depression, use of psychoactive drugs, and baseline season were considered as potential confounders. RESULTS: Women who developed AD (n = 70) had lower baseline vitamin D intakes (mean, 50.3 ± 19.3 μg/wk) than nondemented (n = 361; mean intake = 59.0 ± 29.9 μg/wk, p = .027) or those who developed other dementias (n = 67; mean intake = 63.6 ± 38.1 μg/wk, p = .010). There was no difference between other dementias and no dementia (p = .247). Baseline vitamin D dietary intakes were associated with the onset of AD (adjusted odds ratio = 0.99 [95% confidence interval = 0.98-0.99], p = .041) but not with other dementias (p = .071). Being in the highest quintile of vitamin D dietary intakes was associated with a lower risk of AD compared with the lower 4 quintiles combined (adjusted odds ratio = 0.23 [95% confidence interval = 0.08-0.67], p = .007). CONCLUSIONS: Higher vitamin D dietary intake was associated with a lower risk of developing AD among older women. SN - 1758-535X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22503994/Higher_vitamin_D_dietary_intake_is_associated_with_lower_risk_of_alzheimer's_disease:_a_7_year_follow_up_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/biomedgerontology/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/gerona/gls107 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -