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Total daily physical activity and the risk of AD and cognitive decline in older adults.
Neurology 2012; 78(17):1323-9Neur

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Studies examining the link between objective measures of total daily physical activity and incident Alzheimer disease (AD) are lacking. We tested the hypothesis that an objective measure of total daily physical activity predicts incident AD and cognitive decline.

METHODS

Total daily exercise and nonexercise physical activity was measured continuously for up to 10 days with actigraphy (Actical®; Philips Healthcare, Bend, OR) from 716 older individuals without dementia participating in the Rush Memory and Aging Project, a prospective, observational cohort study. All participants underwent structured annual clinical examination including a battery of 19 cognitive tests.

RESULTS

During an average follow-up of about 4 years, 71 subjects developed clinical AD. In a Cox proportional hazards model adjusting for age, sex, and education, total daily physical activity was associated with incident AD (hazard ratio = 0.477; 95% confidence interval 0.273-0.832). The association remained after adjusting for self-report physical, social, and cognitive activities, as well as current level of motor function, depressive symptoms, chronic health conditions, and APOE allele status. In a linear mixed-effect model, the level of total daily physical activity was associated with the rate of global cognitive decline (estimate 0.033, SE 0.012, p = 0.007).

CONCLUSIONS

A higher level of total daily physical activity is associated with a reduced risk of AD.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Rush Alzheimer’s Disease Center, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL, USA. Aron_S_Buchman@rush.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22517108

Citation

Buchman, A S., et al. "Total Daily Physical Activity and the Risk of AD and Cognitive Decline in Older Adults." Neurology, vol. 78, no. 17, 2012, pp. 1323-9.
Buchman AS, Boyle PA, Yu L, et al. Total daily physical activity and the risk of AD and cognitive decline in older adults. Neurology. 2012;78(17):1323-9.
Buchman, A. S., Boyle, P. A., Yu, L., Shah, R. C., Wilson, R. S., & Bennett, D. A. (2012). Total daily physical activity and the risk of AD and cognitive decline in older adults. Neurology, 78(17), pp. 1323-9. doi:10.1212/WNL.0b013e3182535d35.
Buchman AS, et al. Total Daily Physical Activity and the Risk of AD and Cognitive Decline in Older Adults. Neurology. 2012 Apr 24;78(17):1323-9. PubMed PMID: 22517108.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Total daily physical activity and the risk of AD and cognitive decline in older adults. AU - Buchman,A S, AU - Boyle,P A, AU - Yu,L, AU - Shah,R C, AU - Wilson,R S, AU - Bennett,D A, Y1 - 2012/04/18/ PY - 2012/4/21/entrez PY - 2012/4/21/pubmed PY - 2012/7/21/medline SP - 1323 EP - 9 JF - Neurology JO - Neurology VL - 78 IS - 17 N2 - OBJECTIVE: Studies examining the link between objective measures of total daily physical activity and incident Alzheimer disease (AD) are lacking. We tested the hypothesis that an objective measure of total daily physical activity predicts incident AD and cognitive decline. METHODS: Total daily exercise and nonexercise physical activity was measured continuously for up to 10 days with actigraphy (Actical®; Philips Healthcare, Bend, OR) from 716 older individuals without dementia participating in the Rush Memory and Aging Project, a prospective, observational cohort study. All participants underwent structured annual clinical examination including a battery of 19 cognitive tests. RESULTS: During an average follow-up of about 4 years, 71 subjects developed clinical AD. In a Cox proportional hazards model adjusting for age, sex, and education, total daily physical activity was associated with incident AD (hazard ratio = 0.477; 95% confidence interval 0.273-0.832). The association remained after adjusting for self-report physical, social, and cognitive activities, as well as current level of motor function, depressive symptoms, chronic health conditions, and APOE allele status. In a linear mixed-effect model, the level of total daily physical activity was associated with the rate of global cognitive decline (estimate 0.033, SE 0.012, p = 0.007). CONCLUSIONS: A higher level of total daily physical activity is associated with a reduced risk of AD. SN - 1526-632X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22517108/Total_daily_physical_activity_and_the_risk_of_AD_and_cognitive_decline_in_older_adults_ L2 - http://www.neurology.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=22517108 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -