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Postmenopausal vegetarians' low serum ferritin level may reduce the risk for metabolic syndrome.
Biol Trace Elem Res. 2012 Oct; 149(1):34-41.BT

Abstract

The present study was conducted to compare the serum ferritin status between the postmenopausal vegetarians and non-vegetarians and to identify the relation of serum ferritin with metabolic syndrome (MetS) risk factors in postmenopausal women. The two study groups consisted of postmenopausal vegetarians (n=59) who maintained a vegetarian diet for over 20 years and age-matched non-vegetarian controls (n=48). Anthropometric measurements, dietary intakes, serum metabolic syndrome-related parameters, and serum ferritin level between the two groups were compared. The vegetarians exhibited significantly lower weight (p<0.01), body mass index (BMI) (p<0.001), percentage of body fat (p<0.001), waist circumference (p<0.01), SBP (p<0.001), DBP (p<0.001), and fasting glucose (p<0.05). According to the National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP)-Adult Treatment Panel III criteria for MetS applying Korean guidelines for waist circumference, the prevalence of MetS was lower in vegetarians (33.9 %) than in non-vegetarians (47.9 %). Vegetarians had significantly lower serum level of ferritin (p<0.01) than non-vegetarians. In the correlation analysis, serum ferritin was positively related to fasting glucose (r=0.264, p<0.01), triglycerides (r=0.232, p<0.05), and the NCEP score (r=0.214, p<0.05) and negatively related to high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (r=-0.225, p<0.05) after adjusting for BMI, lifestyle, and dietary factors (animal protein, animal fat, and dietary fiber intake). In conclusion, postmenopausal vegetarians had lower MetS presence and a lower serum ferritin level compared to non-vegetarians. Furthermore, vegetarians' low serum ferritin level may reduce the risk of MetS in postmenopausal women.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Food and Nutrition, Kangwon National University, Samcheok 245-711, South Korea. mhkim1129@kangwon.ac.krNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22528775

Citation

Kim, Mi-Hyun, and Yun Jung Bae. "Postmenopausal Vegetarians' Low Serum Ferritin Level May Reduce the Risk for Metabolic Syndrome." Biological Trace Element Research, vol. 149, no. 1, 2012, pp. 34-41.
Kim MH, Bae YJ. Postmenopausal vegetarians' low serum ferritin level may reduce the risk for metabolic syndrome. Biol Trace Elem Res. 2012;149(1):34-41.
Kim, M. H., & Bae, Y. J. (2012). Postmenopausal vegetarians' low serum ferritin level may reduce the risk for metabolic syndrome. Biological Trace Element Research, 149(1), 34-41. https://doi.org/10.1007/s12011-012-9405-x
Kim MH, Bae YJ. Postmenopausal Vegetarians' Low Serum Ferritin Level May Reduce the Risk for Metabolic Syndrome. Biol Trace Elem Res. 2012;149(1):34-41. PubMed PMID: 22528775.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Postmenopausal vegetarians' low serum ferritin level may reduce the risk for metabolic syndrome. AU - Kim,Mi-Hyun, AU - Bae,Yun Jung, Y1 - 2012/04/25/ PY - 2012/02/27/received PY - 2012/03/26/accepted PY - 2012/4/25/entrez PY - 2012/4/25/pubmed PY - 2013/1/19/medline SP - 34 EP - 41 JF - Biological trace element research JO - Biol Trace Elem Res VL - 149 IS - 1 N2 - The present study was conducted to compare the serum ferritin status between the postmenopausal vegetarians and non-vegetarians and to identify the relation of serum ferritin with metabolic syndrome (MetS) risk factors in postmenopausal women. The two study groups consisted of postmenopausal vegetarians (n=59) who maintained a vegetarian diet for over 20 years and age-matched non-vegetarian controls (n=48). Anthropometric measurements, dietary intakes, serum metabolic syndrome-related parameters, and serum ferritin level between the two groups were compared. The vegetarians exhibited significantly lower weight (p<0.01), body mass index (BMI) (p<0.001), percentage of body fat (p<0.001), waist circumference (p<0.01), SBP (p<0.001), DBP (p<0.001), and fasting glucose (p<0.05). According to the National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP)-Adult Treatment Panel III criteria for MetS applying Korean guidelines for waist circumference, the prevalence of MetS was lower in vegetarians (33.9 %) than in non-vegetarians (47.9 %). Vegetarians had significantly lower serum level of ferritin (p<0.01) than non-vegetarians. In the correlation analysis, serum ferritin was positively related to fasting glucose (r=0.264, p<0.01), triglycerides (r=0.232, p<0.05), and the NCEP score (r=0.214, p<0.05) and negatively related to high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (r=-0.225, p<0.05) after adjusting for BMI, lifestyle, and dietary factors (animal protein, animal fat, and dietary fiber intake). In conclusion, postmenopausal vegetarians had lower MetS presence and a lower serum ferritin level compared to non-vegetarians. Furthermore, vegetarians' low serum ferritin level may reduce the risk of MetS in postmenopausal women. SN - 1559-0720 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22528775/Postmenopausal_vegetarians'_low_serum_ferritin_level_may_reduce_the_risk_for_metabolic_syndrome_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12011-012-9405-x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -