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Pathogenesis and treatment of hepatitis e virus infection.
Gastroenterology. 2012 May; 142(6):1388-1397.e1.G

Abstract

Hepatitis E has been considered to be a travel-associated, acute, self-limiting liver disease that causes fulminant hepatic failure in specific high-risk groups only. However, hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection can also be acquired in industrialized countries-HEV genotype 3 infection is a zoonosis, with pigs and rodents serving as animal reservoirs. In recent years, cases of chronic HEV infection that were associated with progressive liver disease have been described in several cohorts of immunocompromised individuals, including recipients of organ transplants. The topic of hepatitis E is therefore re-emerging and has raised the following important questions: what is the risk for HEV infection in Western countries (eg, from eating uncooked meat)? How frequently does chronic hepatitis E develop among human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients and recipients of organ transplants? What are the treatment options? What is the current status of vaccine development? What do we know about the pathogenesis of HEV infection, and why does it have a more severe course in pregnant women? This review summarizes the current knowledge on the pathogenesis and treatment of HEV infection.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Endocrinology, Hannover Medical School, Hannover, Germany. Wedemeyer.Heiner@mh-hannover.deNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22537448

Citation

Wedemeyer, Heiner, et al. "Pathogenesis and Treatment of Hepatitis E Virus Infection." Gastroenterology, vol. 142, no. 6, 2012, pp. 1388-1397.e1.
Wedemeyer H, Pischke S, Manns MP. Pathogenesis and treatment of hepatitis e virus infection. Gastroenterology. 2012;142(6):1388-1397.e1.
Wedemeyer, H., Pischke, S., & Manns, M. P. (2012). Pathogenesis and treatment of hepatitis e virus infection. Gastroenterology, 142(6), 1388-e1. https://doi.org/10.1053/j.gastro.2012.02.014
Wedemeyer H, Pischke S, Manns MP. Pathogenesis and Treatment of Hepatitis E Virus Infection. Gastroenterology. 2012;142(6):1388-1397.e1. PubMed PMID: 22537448.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Pathogenesis and treatment of hepatitis e virus infection. AU - Wedemeyer,Heiner, AU - Pischke,Sven, AU - Manns,Michael P, PY - 2012/01/17/received PY - 2012/02/14/revised PY - 2012/02/14/accepted PY - 2012/4/28/entrez PY - 2012/4/28/pubmed PY - 2012/6/19/medline SP - 1388 EP - 1397.e1 JF - Gastroenterology JO - Gastroenterology VL - 142 IS - 6 N2 - Hepatitis E has been considered to be a travel-associated, acute, self-limiting liver disease that causes fulminant hepatic failure in specific high-risk groups only. However, hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection can also be acquired in industrialized countries-HEV genotype 3 infection is a zoonosis, with pigs and rodents serving as animal reservoirs. In recent years, cases of chronic HEV infection that were associated with progressive liver disease have been described in several cohorts of immunocompromised individuals, including recipients of organ transplants. The topic of hepatitis E is therefore re-emerging and has raised the following important questions: what is the risk for HEV infection in Western countries (eg, from eating uncooked meat)? How frequently does chronic hepatitis E develop among human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients and recipients of organ transplants? What are the treatment options? What is the current status of vaccine development? What do we know about the pathogenesis of HEV infection, and why does it have a more severe course in pregnant women? This review summarizes the current knowledge on the pathogenesis and treatment of HEV infection. SN - 1528-0012 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22537448/Pathogenesis_and_treatment_of_hepatitis_e_virus_infection_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0016-5085(12)00227-2 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -