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Adiposity and cognitive decline: underlying mechanisms.

Abstract

Level of adiposity is linked to manifest dementia and Alzheimer's disease in epidemiological studies. Overweight and obesity in mid- and late-life may increase risk for dementia, whereas decline in body weight or body mass index and underweight in years preceding and at the time of a dementia diagnosis may also relate to dementia. The role of adiposity during the period of cognitive decline is, as yet, not understood; however, some hypotheses relating adipose tissue to brain can be drawn. This review focuses on potential, varied mechanisms whereby adipose tissue may influence or interact with the brain and/or dementia risk during the dynamic period of life characterized by both body weight and cognitive decline. These mechanisms relate to: a) adipose tissue location and cell types, b) body composition, c) endocrine adipose, and d) the interplay among adipose, brain structure and function, and genes. This review will illustrate that adipose tissue is a quintessential, multifunctional tissue of the human body.

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  • Publisher Full Text
  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    Section for Psychiatry and Neurochemistry, Neuropsychiatric Epidemiology Unit at the Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden. deborah.gustafson@neuro.gu.se

    Source

    Journal of Alzheimer's disease : JAD 30 Suppl 2: 2012 pg S97-112

    MeSH

    Adiponectin
    Adipose Tissue
    Adiposity
    Body Composition
    Body Mass Index
    Body Weight
    Brain
    Cognition Disorders
    Cytokines
    Dementia
    Glucagon-Like Peptide 1
    Humans
    Leptin

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
    Review

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    22543853

    Citation

    Gustafson, Deborah R.. "Adiposity and Cognitive Decline: Underlying Mechanisms." Journal of Alzheimer's Disease : JAD, vol. 30 Suppl 2, 2012, pp. S97-112.
    Gustafson DR. Adiposity and cognitive decline: underlying mechanisms. J Alzheimers Dis. 2012;30 Suppl 2:S97-112.
    Gustafson, D. R. (2012). Adiposity and cognitive decline: underlying mechanisms. Journal of Alzheimer's Disease : JAD, 30 Suppl 2, pp. S97-112. doi:10.3233/JAD-2012-120487.
    Gustafson DR. Adiposity and Cognitive Decline: Underlying Mechanisms. J Alzheimers Dis. 2012;30 Suppl 2:S97-112. PubMed PMID: 22543853.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Adiposity and cognitive decline: underlying mechanisms. A1 - Gustafson,Deborah R, PY - 2012/5/1/entrez PY - 2012/5/1/pubmed PY - 2012/12/13/medline SP - S97 EP - 112 JF - Journal of Alzheimer's disease : JAD JO - J. Alzheimers Dis. VL - 30 Suppl 2 N2 - Level of adiposity is linked to manifest dementia and Alzheimer's disease in epidemiological studies. Overweight and obesity in mid- and late-life may increase risk for dementia, whereas decline in body weight or body mass index and underweight in years preceding and at the time of a dementia diagnosis may also relate to dementia. The role of adiposity during the period of cognitive decline is, as yet, not understood; however, some hypotheses relating adipose tissue to brain can be drawn. This review focuses on potential, varied mechanisms whereby adipose tissue may influence or interact with the brain and/or dementia risk during the dynamic period of life characterized by both body weight and cognitive decline. These mechanisms relate to: a) adipose tissue location and cell types, b) body composition, c) endocrine adipose, and d) the interplay among adipose, brain structure and function, and genes. This review will illustrate that adipose tissue is a quintessential, multifunctional tissue of the human body. SN - 1875-8908 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22543853/Adiposity_and_cognitive_decline:_underlying_mechanisms_ L2 - https://content.iospress.com/openurl?genre=article&id=doi:10.3233/JAD-2012-120487 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -