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Adverse effects of second-generation antipsychotics in children and adolescents: a Bayesian meta-analysis.
J Clin Psychopharmacol. 2012 Jun; 32(3):309-16.JC

Abstract

In adults, second-generation antipsychotics (SGAs) have a low frequency of extrapyramidal syndrome (EPS) and a moderate frequency of metabolic adverse effects. Here we aimed to assess short-term adverse effects of SGAs in children and adolescents. We searched for relevant studies in MEDLINE and EMBASE (1996-2010), Food and Drug Administration and European Medicines Agency clinical trial registries, and reference lists of review articles. We found 41 were short-term (3-12 weeks) controlled studies that evaluated SGA adverse effects in youths. Using Bayesian meta-analysis, we analyzed odds ratios (ORs) or mean average effects. Numbers of arms (subjects) in the 41 trials were aripiprazole, 10 (n = 671); olanzapine, 14 (n = 413); quetiapine, 10 (n = 446); risperidone, 25 (n = 1040); ziprasidone, 4 (n = 228); clozapine, 5 (n = 79); and placebo/untreated, 23 (n = 1138), totaling 93 arms (4015 patients). Clozapine was assessed only for weight gain and somnolence. Compared with placebo, significant treatment-related increases were observed for weight gain with olanzapine (mean ± SD = 3.99 ± 0.42 kg; 95% credible interval, 3.17-4.84 kg), clozapine (2.38 ± 1.13 kg; 95% credible interval, 0.19-4.62 kg), risperidone (2.02 ± 0.32 kg; 95% credible interval, 1.39-2.66 kg), quetiapine (1.74 ± 0.38 kg; 95% credible interval, 0.99-2.5 kg), and aripiprazole (0.89 ± 0.32 kg; 95% credible interval, 0.26-1.51 kg); glucose levels with risperidone (3.7 ± 1.36 mg/dL; 95% credible interval, 1.08-6.42 mg/dL) and olanzapine (2.09 ± 1.08 mg/dL; 95% credible interval, 0.13-4.32 mg/dL); cholesterol levels with quetiapine (10.77 ± 2.14 mg/dL; 95% credible interval, 6.6-14.95 mg/dL) and olanzapine (4.46 ± 1.65 mg/dL; 95% credible interval, 1.24-7.73 mg/dL); triglyceride levels with olanzapine (20.18 ± 5.26 mg/dL; 95% credible interval, 9.85-30.53 mg/dL) and quetiapine (19.5 ± 3.92 mg/dL; 95% credible interval, 11.84-27.17 mg/dL); hyperprolactinemia with risperidone (OR, 38.63; 95% credible interval, 8.62-125.6), olanzapine (OR, 15.6; 95% credible interval, 4.39-41.1), and ziprasidone (OR, 9.35; 95% credible interval, 1.24-37.03); and EPS with ziprasidone (OR, 20.56; 95% credible interval, 3.53-68.94), olanzapine (OR, 6.36; 95% credible interval, 2.43-13.84), aripiprazole (OR, 3.79; 95% credible interval, 2.17-6.17), and risperidone (OR, 3.71; 95% credible interval, 2.18-6.02). All SGAs increased the risk of somnolence/sedation. We conclude that short-term metabolic effects and EPS are frequent in children treated with SGAs. Second-generation antipsychotics have distinct profiles of secondary effects, which should be considered in making treatment decisions.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Université Pierre et Marie Curie, GH Pitié-Salpétrière, Paris, France. david.cohen@psl.aphp.frNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Meta-Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22544019

Citation

Cohen, David, et al. "Adverse Effects of Second-generation Antipsychotics in Children and Adolescents: a Bayesian Meta-analysis." Journal of Clinical Psychopharmacology, vol. 32, no. 3, 2012, pp. 309-16.
Cohen D, Bonnot O, Bodeau N, et al. Adverse effects of second-generation antipsychotics in children and adolescents: a Bayesian meta-analysis. J Clin Psychopharmacol. 2012;32(3):309-16.
Cohen, D., Bonnot, O., Bodeau, N., Consoli, A., & Laurent, C. (2012). Adverse effects of second-generation antipsychotics in children and adolescents: a Bayesian meta-analysis. Journal of Clinical Psychopharmacology, 32(3), 309-16. https://doi.org/10.1097/JCP.0b013e3182549259
Cohen D, et al. Adverse Effects of Second-generation Antipsychotics in Children and Adolescents: a Bayesian Meta-analysis. J Clin Psychopharmacol. 2012;32(3):309-16. PubMed PMID: 22544019.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Adverse effects of second-generation antipsychotics in children and adolescents: a Bayesian meta-analysis. AU - Cohen,David, AU - Bonnot,Olivier, AU - Bodeau,Nicolas, AU - Consoli,Angèle, AU - Laurent,Claudine, PY - 2012/5/1/entrez PY - 2012/5/1/pubmed PY - 2012/9/20/medline SP - 309 EP - 16 JF - Journal of clinical psychopharmacology JO - J Clin Psychopharmacol VL - 32 IS - 3 N2 - In adults, second-generation antipsychotics (SGAs) have a low frequency of extrapyramidal syndrome (EPS) and a moderate frequency of metabolic adverse effects. Here we aimed to assess short-term adverse effects of SGAs in children and adolescents. We searched for relevant studies in MEDLINE and EMBASE (1996-2010), Food and Drug Administration and European Medicines Agency clinical trial registries, and reference lists of review articles. We found 41 were short-term (3-12 weeks) controlled studies that evaluated SGA adverse effects in youths. Using Bayesian meta-analysis, we analyzed odds ratios (ORs) or mean average effects. Numbers of arms (subjects) in the 41 trials were aripiprazole, 10 (n = 671); olanzapine, 14 (n = 413); quetiapine, 10 (n = 446); risperidone, 25 (n = 1040); ziprasidone, 4 (n = 228); clozapine, 5 (n = 79); and placebo/untreated, 23 (n = 1138), totaling 93 arms (4015 patients). Clozapine was assessed only for weight gain and somnolence. Compared with placebo, significant treatment-related increases were observed for weight gain with olanzapine (mean ± SD = 3.99 ± 0.42 kg; 95% credible interval, 3.17-4.84 kg), clozapine (2.38 ± 1.13 kg; 95% credible interval, 0.19-4.62 kg), risperidone (2.02 ± 0.32 kg; 95% credible interval, 1.39-2.66 kg), quetiapine (1.74 ± 0.38 kg; 95% credible interval, 0.99-2.5 kg), and aripiprazole (0.89 ± 0.32 kg; 95% credible interval, 0.26-1.51 kg); glucose levels with risperidone (3.7 ± 1.36 mg/dL; 95% credible interval, 1.08-6.42 mg/dL) and olanzapine (2.09 ± 1.08 mg/dL; 95% credible interval, 0.13-4.32 mg/dL); cholesterol levels with quetiapine (10.77 ± 2.14 mg/dL; 95% credible interval, 6.6-14.95 mg/dL) and olanzapine (4.46 ± 1.65 mg/dL; 95% credible interval, 1.24-7.73 mg/dL); triglyceride levels with olanzapine (20.18 ± 5.26 mg/dL; 95% credible interval, 9.85-30.53 mg/dL) and quetiapine (19.5 ± 3.92 mg/dL; 95% credible interval, 11.84-27.17 mg/dL); hyperprolactinemia with risperidone (OR, 38.63; 95% credible interval, 8.62-125.6), olanzapine (OR, 15.6; 95% credible interval, 4.39-41.1), and ziprasidone (OR, 9.35; 95% credible interval, 1.24-37.03); and EPS with ziprasidone (OR, 20.56; 95% credible interval, 3.53-68.94), olanzapine (OR, 6.36; 95% credible interval, 2.43-13.84), aripiprazole (OR, 3.79; 95% credible interval, 2.17-6.17), and risperidone (OR, 3.71; 95% credible interval, 2.18-6.02). All SGAs increased the risk of somnolence/sedation. We conclude that short-term metabolic effects and EPS are frequent in children treated with SGAs. Second-generation antipsychotics have distinct profiles of secondary effects, which should be considered in making treatment decisions. SN - 1533-712X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22544019/Adverse_effects_of_second_generation_antipsychotics_in_children_and_adolescents:_a_Bayesian_meta_analysis_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1097/JCP.0b013e3182549259 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -