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A new metric of antibiotic class resistance in gram-negative bacilli isolated from hospitalized children.
Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 2012 Jun; 33(6):602-7.IC

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

The purpose of this study was to describe patterns of infection or colonization with antibiotic-resistant gram-negative bacilli (GNB) in hospitalized children utilizing an electronic health record.

SETTING

Tertiary care facility.

PARTICIPANTS

Pediatric patients 18 years of age or younger hospitalized from January 1, 2006, to December 31, 2008.

METHODS

Children were identified who had (1) at least 1 positive culture for a multidrug-resistant (MDR) GNB, defined as a GNB with resistance to 3 or more antibiotic classes; or (2) additive drug resistance, defined as isolation of more than 1 GNB that collectively as a group demonstrated resistance to 3 or more antibiotic classes over the study period. Differences in clinical characteristics between the 2 groups were ascertained, including history of admissions and transfers, comorbid conditions, receipt of procedures, and antibiotic exposure.

RESULTS

Of 56,235 pediatric patients, 46 children were infected or colonized with an MDR GNB, of which 16 were resistant to 3 classes and 30 were resistant to 4 classes. Another 39 patients had positive cultures for GNB that exhibited additive drug resistance. Patients with additive drug resistance were more likely than patients with MDR GNB to have had previous admissions to a long-term facility (8 vs 2; P = .04) and had more mean admissions (7 vs 3; P < .01) and more mean antibiotic-days (P < .01 to P = .02). Six patients with additive drug resistance later had a positive culture with an MDR GNB.

CONCLUSIONS

An electronic health record can be used to track antibiotic class resistance in GNB isolated from hospitalized children over multiple cultures and hospitalizations.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Pediatrics, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032, USA. sp2172@columbia.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Evaluation Study
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22561716

Citation

Patel, Sameer J., et al. "A New Metric of Antibiotic Class Resistance in Gram-negative Bacilli Isolated From Hospitalized Children." Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology, vol. 33, no. 6, 2012, pp. 602-7.
Patel SJ, O'Toole D, Larson E. A new metric of antibiotic class resistance in gram-negative bacilli isolated from hospitalized children. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 2012;33(6):602-7.
Patel, S. J., O'Toole, D., & Larson, E. (2012). A new metric of antibiotic class resistance in gram-negative bacilli isolated from hospitalized children. Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology, 33(6), 602-7. https://doi.org/10.1086/665709
Patel SJ, O'Toole D, Larson E. A New Metric of Antibiotic Class Resistance in Gram-negative Bacilli Isolated From Hospitalized Children. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 2012;33(6):602-7. PubMed PMID: 22561716.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - A new metric of antibiotic class resistance in gram-negative bacilli isolated from hospitalized children. AU - Patel,Sameer J, AU - O'Toole,Dana, AU - Larson,Elaine, Y1 - 2012/04/13/ PY - 2012/5/8/entrez PY - 2012/5/9/pubmed PY - 2012/8/31/medline SP - 602 EP - 7 JF - Infection control and hospital epidemiology JO - Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol VL - 33 IS - 6 N2 - OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to describe patterns of infection or colonization with antibiotic-resistant gram-negative bacilli (GNB) in hospitalized children utilizing an electronic health record. SETTING: Tertiary care facility. PARTICIPANTS: Pediatric patients 18 years of age or younger hospitalized from January 1, 2006, to December 31, 2008. METHODS: Children were identified who had (1) at least 1 positive culture for a multidrug-resistant (MDR) GNB, defined as a GNB with resistance to 3 or more antibiotic classes; or (2) additive drug resistance, defined as isolation of more than 1 GNB that collectively as a group demonstrated resistance to 3 or more antibiotic classes over the study period. Differences in clinical characteristics between the 2 groups were ascertained, including history of admissions and transfers, comorbid conditions, receipt of procedures, and antibiotic exposure. RESULTS: Of 56,235 pediatric patients, 46 children were infected or colonized with an MDR GNB, of which 16 were resistant to 3 classes and 30 were resistant to 4 classes. Another 39 patients had positive cultures for GNB that exhibited additive drug resistance. Patients with additive drug resistance were more likely than patients with MDR GNB to have had previous admissions to a long-term facility (8 vs 2; P = .04) and had more mean admissions (7 vs 3; P < .01) and more mean antibiotic-days (P < .01 to P = .02). Six patients with additive drug resistance later had a positive culture with an MDR GNB. CONCLUSIONS: An electronic health record can be used to track antibiotic class resistance in GNB isolated from hospitalized children over multiple cultures and hospitalizations. SN - 1559-6834 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22561716/A_new_metric_of_antibiotic_class_resistance_in_gram_negative_bacilli_isolated_from_hospitalized_children_ L2 - http://ovidsp.ovid.com/ovidweb.cgi?T=JS&amp;PAGE=linkout&amp;SEARCH=22561716.ui DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -