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A dose-response meta-analysis of coffee consumption and bladder cancer.
Prev Med. 2012 Jul; 55(1):14-22.PM

Abstract

BACKGROUND

A number of studies have examined the association between coffee consumption and risk of bladder cancer, but uncertainty about the dose-response relationship remains.

MATERIALS AND METHODS

A comprehensive search was performed to identify all observational studies providing quantitative estimates between bladder cancer risk and coffee consumption. Dose-response relationship was assessed by restricted cubic spline model and bivariate random-effect meta-regression.

RESULTS

23 case-control studies with 7690 cases and 13,507 controls, and 5 cohort studies with 700 cases and 229,099 participants, met the inclusion criteria. Compared with non-drinkers and for case-control studies, the pooled smoking-adjusted RRs(95% CI) of bladder cancer were 1.07(1.02-1.13) for 1 cup/day, 1.15(1.05-1.26) for 2 cups/day, 1.22(1.08-1.38) for 3 cups/day, and 1.29(1.12-1.48) for 4 cups/day. For cohort studies, the pooled smoking-adjusted RRs of bladder cancer were 1.09(95% CI, 0.89-1.34) for 1 cup/day, 1.13(95% CI, 0.82-1.55) for 2 cups/day, 1.09(95% CI, 0.77-1.56) for 3 cups/day, and 1.01(95% CI, 0.69-1.48) for 4 cups/day.

CONCLUSIONS

Although data from case-control studies suggested that coffee was a risk factor for bladder cancer, there was no conclusive evidence on this association because of inconsistencies between case-control and cohort studies.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Epidemiology and Health Statistics, Shandong University, PR China.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Meta-Analysis

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22564775

Citation

Zhou, Yunping, et al. "A Dose-response Meta-analysis of Coffee Consumption and Bladder Cancer." Preventive Medicine, vol. 55, no. 1, 2012, pp. 14-22.
Zhou Y, Tian C, Jia C. A dose-response meta-analysis of coffee consumption and bladder cancer. Prev Med. 2012;55(1):14-22.
Zhou, Y., Tian, C., & Jia, C. (2012). A dose-response meta-analysis of coffee consumption and bladder cancer. Preventive Medicine, 55(1), 14-22. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ypmed.2012.04.020
Zhou Y, Tian C, Jia C. A Dose-response Meta-analysis of Coffee Consumption and Bladder Cancer. Prev Med. 2012;55(1):14-22. PubMed PMID: 22564775.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - A dose-response meta-analysis of coffee consumption and bladder cancer. AU - Zhou,Yunping, AU - Tian,Changwei, AU - Jia,Chongqi, Y1 - 2012/05/04/ PY - 2011/12/22/received PY - 2012/04/24/revised PY - 2012/04/27/accepted PY - 2012/5/9/entrez PY - 2012/5/9/pubmed PY - 2012/11/14/medline SP - 14 EP - 22 JF - Preventive medicine JO - Prev Med VL - 55 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: A number of studies have examined the association between coffee consumption and risk of bladder cancer, but uncertainty about the dose-response relationship remains. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A comprehensive search was performed to identify all observational studies providing quantitative estimates between bladder cancer risk and coffee consumption. Dose-response relationship was assessed by restricted cubic spline model and bivariate random-effect meta-regression. RESULTS: 23 case-control studies with 7690 cases and 13,507 controls, and 5 cohort studies with 700 cases and 229,099 participants, met the inclusion criteria. Compared with non-drinkers and for case-control studies, the pooled smoking-adjusted RRs(95% CI) of bladder cancer were 1.07(1.02-1.13) for 1 cup/day, 1.15(1.05-1.26) for 2 cups/day, 1.22(1.08-1.38) for 3 cups/day, and 1.29(1.12-1.48) for 4 cups/day. For cohort studies, the pooled smoking-adjusted RRs of bladder cancer were 1.09(95% CI, 0.89-1.34) for 1 cup/day, 1.13(95% CI, 0.82-1.55) for 2 cups/day, 1.09(95% CI, 0.77-1.56) for 3 cups/day, and 1.01(95% CI, 0.69-1.48) for 4 cups/day. CONCLUSIONS: Although data from case-control studies suggested that coffee was a risk factor for bladder cancer, there was no conclusive evidence on this association because of inconsistencies between case-control and cohort studies. SN - 1096-0260 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22564775/A_dose_response_meta_analysis_of_coffee_consumption_and_bladder_cancer_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0091-7435(12)00163-6 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -