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Effectiveness and net cost of reminder/recall for adolescent immunizations.
Pediatrics. 2012 Jun; 129(6):e1437-45.Ped

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To assess the effectiveness of reminder/recall (R/R) for immunizing adolescents in private pediatric practices and to describe the associated costs and revenues.

METHODS

We conducted a randomized controlled trial in 4 private pediatric practices in metropolitan Denver. In each practice, 400 adolescents aged 11 to 18 years who had not received 1 or more targeted vaccinations (tetanus-diphtheria-acellular pertussis, meningococcal conjugate, or first dose of human papillomavirus vaccine for female patients) were randomly selected and randomized to intervention (2 letters and 2 telephone calls) or control (usual care) groups. Primary outcomes were receipt of >1 targeted vaccines and receipt of all targeted vaccines 6 months postintervention. We calculated net additional revenue for each additional adolescent who received at least 1 targeted vaccine and for those who received all targeted vaccines.

RESULTS

Eight hundred adolescents were randomized to the intervention and 800 to the control group. Baseline rates of having already received tetanus-diphtheria-acellular pertussis, meningococcal conjugate, and first dose of human papillomavirus vaccine before R/R ranged from 33% to 54%. Postintervention, the intervention group had significantly higher proportions of receipt of at least 1 targeted vaccine (47.1% vs 34.6%, P < .0001) and receipt of all targeted vaccines (36.2% vs 25.2%, P < .0001) compared with the control group. Three practices had positive net revenues from R/R; 1 showed net losses.

CONCLUSIONS

R/R was successful at increasing immunization rates in adolescents and effect sizes were comparable to those in younger children. Practices conducting R/R may benefit financially if they can generate additional well-child care visits and keep supply costs low.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Children’s Outcomes Research Program, Children’s Hospital Colorado, Aurora, Colorado 80045, USA. christina.suh@ucdenver.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22566415

Citation

Suh, Christina A., et al. "Effectiveness and Net Cost of Reminder/recall for Adolescent Immunizations." Pediatrics, vol. 129, no. 6, 2012, pp. e1437-45.
Suh CA, Saville A, Daley MF, et al. Effectiveness and net cost of reminder/recall for adolescent immunizations. Pediatrics. 2012;129(6):e1437-45.
Suh, C. A., Saville, A., Daley, M. F., Glazner, J. E., Barrow, J., Stokley, S., Dong, F., Beaty, B., Dickinson, L. M., & Kempe, A. (2012). Effectiveness and net cost of reminder/recall for adolescent immunizations. Pediatrics, 129(6), e1437-45. https://doi.org/10.1542/peds.2011-1714
Suh CA, et al. Effectiveness and Net Cost of Reminder/recall for Adolescent Immunizations. Pediatrics. 2012;129(6):e1437-45. PubMed PMID: 22566415.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effectiveness and net cost of reminder/recall for adolescent immunizations. AU - Suh,Christina A, AU - Saville,Alison, AU - Daley,Matthew F, AU - Glazner,Judith E, AU - Barrow,Jennifer, AU - Stokley,Shannon, AU - Dong,Fran, AU - Beaty,Brenda, AU - Dickinson,L Miriam, AU - Kempe,Allison, Y1 - 2012/05/07/ PY - 2012/5/9/entrez PY - 2012/5/9/pubmed PY - 2012/8/8/medline SP - e1437 EP - 45 JF - Pediatrics JO - Pediatrics VL - 129 IS - 6 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To assess the effectiveness of reminder/recall (R/R) for immunizing adolescents in private pediatric practices and to describe the associated costs and revenues. METHODS: We conducted a randomized controlled trial in 4 private pediatric practices in metropolitan Denver. In each practice, 400 adolescents aged 11 to 18 years who had not received 1 or more targeted vaccinations (tetanus-diphtheria-acellular pertussis, meningococcal conjugate, or first dose of human papillomavirus vaccine for female patients) were randomly selected and randomized to intervention (2 letters and 2 telephone calls) or control (usual care) groups. Primary outcomes were receipt of >1 targeted vaccines and receipt of all targeted vaccines 6 months postintervention. We calculated net additional revenue for each additional adolescent who received at least 1 targeted vaccine and for those who received all targeted vaccines. RESULTS: Eight hundred adolescents were randomized to the intervention and 800 to the control group. Baseline rates of having already received tetanus-diphtheria-acellular pertussis, meningococcal conjugate, and first dose of human papillomavirus vaccine before R/R ranged from 33% to 54%. Postintervention, the intervention group had significantly higher proportions of receipt of at least 1 targeted vaccine (47.1% vs 34.6%, P < .0001) and receipt of all targeted vaccines (36.2% vs 25.2%, P < .0001) compared with the control group. Three practices had positive net revenues from R/R; 1 showed net losses. CONCLUSIONS: R/R was successful at increasing immunization rates in adolescents and effect sizes were comparable to those in younger children. Practices conducting R/R may benefit financially if they can generate additional well-child care visits and keep supply costs low. SN - 1098-4275 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22566415/Effectiveness_and_net_cost_of_reminder/recall_for_adolescent_immunizations_ L2 - http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&amp;pmid=22566415 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -