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Equine insect bite hypersensitivity: what do we know?
Vet Immunol Immunopathol. 2012 Jun 30; 147(3-4):113-26.VI

Abstract

Insect bite hypersensitivity (IBH) is an allergic dermatitis of the horse caused by bites of insects of the genus Culicoides and is currently the best characterized allergic disease of horses. This article reviews knowledge of the immunopathogenesis of IBH, with a particular focus on the causative allergens. Whereas so far hardly any research has been done on the role of antigen presenting cells in the pathogenesis of IBH, recent studies suggest that IBH is characterized by an imbalance between a T helper 2 (Th2) and regulatory T cell (T(reg)) immune response, as shown both locally in the skin and with stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Various studies have shown IBH to be associated with IgE-mediated reactions against salivary antigens from Culicoides spp. However, until recently, the causative allergens had not been characterized at the molecular level. A major advance has now been made, as 11 Culicoides salivary gland proteins have been identified as relevant allergens for IBH. Currently, there is no satisfactory treatment of IBH. Characterization of the main allergens for IBH and understanding what mechanisms induce a healthy or allergic immune response towards these allergens may help to develop new treatment strategies, such as immunotherapy.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Swiss Institute of Allergy and Asthma Research-SIAF, University of Zürich, Obere Strasse 22, CH-7270 Davos, Switzerland.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22575371

Citation

Schaffartzik, A, et al. "Equine Insect Bite Hypersensitivity: what Do We Know?" Veterinary Immunology and Immunopathology, vol. 147, no. 3-4, 2012, pp. 113-26.
Schaffartzik A, Hamza E, Janda J, et al. Equine insect bite hypersensitivity: what do we know? Vet Immunol Immunopathol. 2012;147(3-4):113-26.
Schaffartzik, A., Hamza, E., Janda, J., Crameri, R., Marti, E., & Rhyner, C. (2012). Equine insect bite hypersensitivity: what do we know? Veterinary Immunology and Immunopathology, 147(3-4), 113-26. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.vetimm.2012.03.017
Schaffartzik A, et al. Equine Insect Bite Hypersensitivity: what Do We Know. Vet Immunol Immunopathol. 2012 Jun 30;147(3-4):113-26. PubMed PMID: 22575371.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Equine insect bite hypersensitivity: what do we know? AU - Schaffartzik,A, AU - Hamza,E, AU - Janda,J, AU - Crameri,R, AU - Marti,E, AU - Rhyner,C, Y1 - 2012/04/03/ PY - 2011/02/10/received PY - 2012/02/26/revised PY - 2012/03/27/accepted PY - 2012/5/12/entrez PY - 2012/5/12/pubmed PY - 2012/9/27/medline SP - 113 EP - 26 JF - Veterinary immunology and immunopathology JO - Vet Immunol Immunopathol VL - 147 IS - 3-4 N2 - Insect bite hypersensitivity (IBH) is an allergic dermatitis of the horse caused by bites of insects of the genus Culicoides and is currently the best characterized allergic disease of horses. This article reviews knowledge of the immunopathogenesis of IBH, with a particular focus on the causative allergens. Whereas so far hardly any research has been done on the role of antigen presenting cells in the pathogenesis of IBH, recent studies suggest that IBH is characterized by an imbalance between a T helper 2 (Th2) and regulatory T cell (T(reg)) immune response, as shown both locally in the skin and with stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Various studies have shown IBH to be associated with IgE-mediated reactions against salivary antigens from Culicoides spp. However, until recently, the causative allergens had not been characterized at the molecular level. A major advance has now been made, as 11 Culicoides salivary gland proteins have been identified as relevant allergens for IBH. Currently, there is no satisfactory treatment of IBH. Characterization of the main allergens for IBH and understanding what mechanisms induce a healthy or allergic immune response towards these allergens may help to develop new treatment strategies, such as immunotherapy. SN - 1873-2534 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22575371/Equine_insect_bite_hypersensitivity:_what_do_we_know L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0165-2427(12)00090-6 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -