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Brain correlates of musical and facial emotion recognition: evidence from the dementias.
Neuropsychologia. 2012 Jul; 50(8):1814-22.N

Abstract

The recognition of facial expressions of emotion is impaired in semantic dementia (SD) and is associated with right-sided brain atrophy in areas known to be involved in emotion processing, notably the amygdala. Whether patients with SD also experience difficulty recognizing emotions conveyed by other media, such as music, is unclear. Prior studies have used excerpts of known music from classical or film repertoire but not unfamiliar melodies designed to convey distinct emotions. Patients with SD (n = 11), Alzheimer's disease (n = 12) and healthy control participants (n = 20) underwent tests of emotion recognition in two modalities: unfamiliar musical tunes and unknown faces as well as volumetric MRI. Patients with SD were most impaired with the recognition of facial and musical emotions, particularly for negative emotions. Voxel-based morphometry showed that the labelling of emotions, regardless of modality, correlated with the degree of atrophy in the right temporal pole, amygdala and insula. The recognition of musical (but not facial) emotions was also associated with atrophy of the left anterior and inferior temporal lobe, which overlapped with regions correlating with standardized measures of verbal semantic memory. These findings highlight the common neural substrates supporting the processing of emotions by facial and musical stimuli but also indicate that the recognition of emotions from music draws upon brain regions that are associated with semantics in language.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Neuroscience Research Australia, Sydney, NSW 2031, Australia.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22579645

Citation

Hsieh, S, et al. "Brain Correlates of Musical and Facial Emotion Recognition: Evidence From the Dementias." Neuropsychologia, vol. 50, no. 8, 2012, pp. 1814-22.
Hsieh S, Hornberger M, Piguet O, et al. Brain correlates of musical and facial emotion recognition: evidence from the dementias. Neuropsychologia. 2012;50(8):1814-22.
Hsieh, S., Hornberger, M., Piguet, O., & Hodges, J. R. (2012). Brain correlates of musical and facial emotion recognition: evidence from the dementias. Neuropsychologia, 50(8), 1814-22. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2012.04.006
Hsieh S, et al. Brain Correlates of Musical and Facial Emotion Recognition: Evidence From the Dementias. Neuropsychologia. 2012;50(8):1814-22. PubMed PMID: 22579645.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Brain correlates of musical and facial emotion recognition: evidence from the dementias. AU - Hsieh,S, AU - Hornberger,M, AU - Piguet,O, AU - Hodges,J R, Y1 - 2012/05/03/ PY - 2011/11/07/received PY - 2012/02/23/revised PY - 2012/04/08/accepted PY - 2012/5/15/entrez PY - 2012/5/15/pubmed PY - 2012/12/10/medline SP - 1814 EP - 22 JF - Neuropsychologia JO - Neuropsychologia VL - 50 IS - 8 N2 - The recognition of facial expressions of emotion is impaired in semantic dementia (SD) and is associated with right-sided brain atrophy in areas known to be involved in emotion processing, notably the amygdala. Whether patients with SD also experience difficulty recognizing emotions conveyed by other media, such as music, is unclear. Prior studies have used excerpts of known music from classical or film repertoire but not unfamiliar melodies designed to convey distinct emotions. Patients with SD (n = 11), Alzheimer's disease (n = 12) and healthy control participants (n = 20) underwent tests of emotion recognition in two modalities: unfamiliar musical tunes and unknown faces as well as volumetric MRI. Patients with SD were most impaired with the recognition of facial and musical emotions, particularly for negative emotions. Voxel-based morphometry showed that the labelling of emotions, regardless of modality, correlated with the degree of atrophy in the right temporal pole, amygdala and insula. The recognition of musical (but not facial) emotions was also associated with atrophy of the left anterior and inferior temporal lobe, which overlapped with regions correlating with standardized measures of verbal semantic memory. These findings highlight the common neural substrates supporting the processing of emotions by facial and musical stimuli but also indicate that the recognition of emotions from music draws upon brain regions that are associated with semantics in language. SN - 1873-3514 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22579645/Brain_correlates_of_musical_and_facial_emotion_recognition:_evidence_from_the_dementias_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -