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Ergonomics in thoracoscopic surgery: results of a survey among thoracic surgeons.
Interact Cardiovasc Thorac Surg. 2012 Aug; 15(2):197-200.IC

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

The frequent and prolonged use of thoracoscopic equipment raises ergonomic risks which may cause physical distress. We aimed to determine the relationship between ergonomic problems encountered in thoracoscopic surgery and physical distress among thoracic surgeons.

METHODS

An online questionnaire which investigated personal factors, product factors, interaction factors and physical discomfort was sent to all members of the European Society of Thoracic Surgeons (ESTS).

RESULTS

Of the respondents, 2.4% indicated that a one arm's length should be the optimal distance between the surgeon and the monitor. Only 2.4% indicated that the monitor should be positioned below the eye level of the surgeon. Most of the respondents agreed, partially to fully, that they experienced neck discomfort because of inappropriate monitor height, bad monitor position and bad table height. Most respondents experienced numb fingers and shoulder discomfort due to instrument manipulation. Most of the respondents (77.1%) experienced muscle fatigue to some extent due to a static posture during thoracoscopic surgery. The majority of respondents (81.9, 76.3 and 83.2% respectively) indicated that they had varying degrees of discomfort mainly in the neck, shoulder and back. Some 94.4% of respondents were unaware of any guidelines concerning table height, monitor and instrument placement for endoscopic surgery.

CONCLUSIONS

Most thoracic surgeons in Europe are unaware of ergonomic guidelines and do not practise them, hence they suffer varying degrees of physical discomfort arising from ergonomic issues.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Thoracic Surgery, Klinikum Bremen-Ost, Bremen, Germany. katrin.welcker@klinikum-bremen-ost.deNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22586071

Citation

Welcker, Katrin, et al. "Ergonomics in Thoracoscopic Surgery: Results of a Survey Among Thoracic Surgeons." Interactive Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery, vol. 15, no. 2, 2012, pp. 197-200.
Welcker K, Kesieme EB, Internullo E, et al. Ergonomics in thoracoscopic surgery: results of a survey among thoracic surgeons. Interact Cardiovasc Thorac Surg. 2012;15(2):197-200.
Welcker, K., Kesieme, E. B., Internullo, E., & Kranenburg van Koppen, L. J. (2012). Ergonomics in thoracoscopic surgery: results of a survey among thoracic surgeons. Interactive Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery, 15(2), 197-200. https://doi.org/10.1093/icvts/ivs173
Welcker K, et al. Ergonomics in Thoracoscopic Surgery: Results of a Survey Among Thoracic Surgeons. Interact Cardiovasc Thorac Surg. 2012;15(2):197-200. PubMed PMID: 22586071.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Ergonomics in thoracoscopic surgery: results of a survey among thoracic surgeons. AU - Welcker,Katrin, AU - Kesieme,Emeka B, AU - Internullo,Eveline, AU - Kranenburg van Koppen,Laura J C, Y1 - 2012/05/14/ PY - 2012/5/16/entrez PY - 2012/5/16/pubmed PY - 2012/12/10/medline SP - 197 EP - 200 JF - Interactive cardiovascular and thoracic surgery JO - Interact Cardiovasc Thorac Surg VL - 15 IS - 2 N2 - OBJECTIVES: The frequent and prolonged use of thoracoscopic equipment raises ergonomic risks which may cause physical distress. We aimed to determine the relationship between ergonomic problems encountered in thoracoscopic surgery and physical distress among thoracic surgeons. METHODS: An online questionnaire which investigated personal factors, product factors, interaction factors and physical discomfort was sent to all members of the European Society of Thoracic Surgeons (ESTS). RESULTS: Of the respondents, 2.4% indicated that a one arm's length should be the optimal distance between the surgeon and the monitor. Only 2.4% indicated that the monitor should be positioned below the eye level of the surgeon. Most of the respondents agreed, partially to fully, that they experienced neck discomfort because of inappropriate monitor height, bad monitor position and bad table height. Most respondents experienced numb fingers and shoulder discomfort due to instrument manipulation. Most of the respondents (77.1%) experienced muscle fatigue to some extent due to a static posture during thoracoscopic surgery. The majority of respondents (81.9, 76.3 and 83.2% respectively) indicated that they had varying degrees of discomfort mainly in the neck, shoulder and back. Some 94.4% of respondents were unaware of any guidelines concerning table height, monitor and instrument placement for endoscopic surgery. CONCLUSIONS: Most thoracic surgeons in Europe are unaware of ergonomic guidelines and do not practise them, hence they suffer varying degrees of physical discomfort arising from ergonomic issues. SN - 1569-9285 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22586071/Ergonomics_in_thoracoscopic_surgery:_results_of_a_survey_among_thoracic_surgeons_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/icvts/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/icvts/ivs173 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -