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Hydration, sweat and thermoregulatory responses to professional football training in the heat.
J Sports Sci. 2012; 30(10):957-65.JS

Abstract

AbstThis study examined the relationship between intensity of training and changes in hydration status, core temperature, sweat rate and composition and fluid balance in professional football players training in the heat. Thirteen professional football players completed three training sessions; "higher-intensity" (140 min; HI140), "lower-intensity" (120 min; LI120) and "game-simulation" (100 min; GS100). Movement demands were measured by Global Positioning System, sweat rate and concentration were determined from dermal patches and body mass change. Despite similar environmental conditions (26.9 ± 0.1 °C and 65.0 ± 7.0% relative humidity [Rh]), higher relative speeds (m · min(-1)) and increased perceptions of effort and thermal strain were observed in HI140 and GS100 compared with LI120 (P < 0.05). Significantly (P < 0.05) greater sweat rate (L · h(-1)) and electrolyte losses (g) were observed in HI140 and GS100 compared with LI120. Rate of rise in core temperature was correlated with mean speed (r = 0.85), session rating of perceived exertion (sRPE) (r = 0.61), loss of potassium (K+) (r = 0.51) sweat rate (r = 0.49), and total sweat loss (r = 0.53), with mean speed the strongest predictor. Sodium (Na+) (r = 0.39) and K+ (r = 0.50) losses were associated with total distance covered. In hot conditions, individualised rehydration practices should be adopted following football training to account for differences in sweat rate and electrolyte losses in response to intensity and overall activity within a session.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Human Movement Studies, Charles Sturt University, Bathurst, Australia.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22620496

Citation

Duffield, Rob, et al. "Hydration, Sweat and Thermoregulatory Responses to Professional Football Training in the Heat." Journal of Sports Sciences, vol. 30, no. 10, 2012, pp. 957-65.
Duffield R, McCall A, Coutts AJ, et al. Hydration, sweat and thermoregulatory responses to professional football training in the heat. J Sports Sci. 2012;30(10):957-65.
Duffield, R., McCall, A., Coutts, A. J., & Peiffer, J. J. (2012). Hydration, sweat and thermoregulatory responses to professional football training in the heat. Journal of Sports Sciences, 30(10), 957-65. https://doi.org/10.1080/02640414.2012.689432
Duffield R, et al. Hydration, Sweat and Thermoregulatory Responses to Professional Football Training in the Heat. J Sports Sci. 2012;30(10):957-65. PubMed PMID: 22620496.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Hydration, sweat and thermoregulatory responses to professional football training in the heat. AU - Duffield,Rob, AU - McCall,Allan, AU - Coutts,Aaron James, AU - Peiffer,Jeremiah John, Y1 - 2012/05/24/ PY - 2012/5/25/entrez PY - 2012/5/25/pubmed PY - 2012/10/23/medline SP - 957 EP - 65 JF - Journal of sports sciences JO - J Sports Sci VL - 30 IS - 10 N2 - AbstThis study examined the relationship between intensity of training and changes in hydration status, core temperature, sweat rate and composition and fluid balance in professional football players training in the heat. Thirteen professional football players completed three training sessions; "higher-intensity" (140 min; HI140), "lower-intensity" (120 min; LI120) and "game-simulation" (100 min; GS100). Movement demands were measured by Global Positioning System, sweat rate and concentration were determined from dermal patches and body mass change. Despite similar environmental conditions (26.9 ± 0.1 °C and 65.0 ± 7.0% relative humidity [Rh]), higher relative speeds (m · min(-1)) and increased perceptions of effort and thermal strain were observed in HI140 and GS100 compared with LI120 (P < 0.05). Significantly (P < 0.05) greater sweat rate (L · h(-1)) and electrolyte losses (g) were observed in HI140 and GS100 compared with LI120. Rate of rise in core temperature was correlated with mean speed (r = 0.85), session rating of perceived exertion (sRPE) (r = 0.61), loss of potassium (K+) (r = 0.51) sweat rate (r = 0.49), and total sweat loss (r = 0.53), with mean speed the strongest predictor. Sodium (Na+) (r = 0.39) and K+ (r = 0.50) losses were associated with total distance covered. In hot conditions, individualised rehydration practices should be adopted following football training to account for differences in sweat rate and electrolyte losses in response to intensity and overall activity within a session. SN - 1466-447X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22620496/Hydration_sweat_and_thermoregulatory_responses_to_professional_football_training_in_the_heat_ L2 - https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/02640414.2012.689432 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -