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Alcohol and secobarbital effects as a function of familial alcoholism: acute psychophysiological effects.
Alcohol Clin Exp Res 1990; 14(5):704-12AC

Abstract

Previous research has demonstrated response differences following administration of alcohol between adult males with a positive (FHP) versus negative (FHN) family history of alcoholism. These response differences are thought to reflect differences in vulnerability to dependence on alcohol. Thus, the role of positive family alcoholism history in increasing risk of addiction to a variety of drug classes might be studied by determining whether FHP subjects show different responses to drug classes other than alcohol. This was done in the present study by determining dose-effect functions for a variety of physiological (heart rate, skin conductance, skin temperature), subjective (analog mood and drug effect, Subjective High Assessment Scale), and psychomotor measures (hand tremor, body sway, Digit Symbol Substitution Test, eye-hand coordination, and numeric recall) in FHP and FHN college-aged males for secobarbital (0, 100, 200 mg by mouth) and ethanol (1 g/kg). FHP and FHN subjects were matched on light-to-moderate drinking patterns, anthropometric dimensions, age, years of schooling, and drug use. At equivalent blood alcohol levels family-history positive subjects reported greater effects of ethanol than did family-history negative subjects on almost all subjective measures. Following the high dose of secobarbital, FHP but not FHN subjects showed elevated subjective effects; these effects were substantially less and were evident in fewer measures than following ethanol. In contrast to effects on the subjective measures, ethanol and secobarbital produced comparable impairment in both groups of subjects for most psychomotor responses. Group differences were not obtained on any physiological measures.(

ABSTRACT

TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

2264598

Citation

McCaul, M E., et al. "Alcohol and Secobarbital Effects as a Function of Familial Alcoholism: Acute Psychophysiological Effects." Alcoholism, Clinical and Experimental Research, vol. 14, no. 5, 1990, pp. 704-12.
McCaul ME, Turkkan JS, Svikis DS, et al. Alcohol and secobarbital effects as a function of familial alcoholism: acute psychophysiological effects. Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 1990;14(5):704-12.
McCaul, M. E., Turkkan, J. S., Svikis, D. S., & Bigelow, G. E. (1990). Alcohol and secobarbital effects as a function of familial alcoholism: acute psychophysiological effects. Alcoholism, Clinical and Experimental Research, 14(5), pp. 704-12.
McCaul ME, et al. Alcohol and Secobarbital Effects as a Function of Familial Alcoholism: Acute Psychophysiological Effects. Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 1990;14(5):704-12. PubMed PMID: 2264598.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Alcohol and secobarbital effects as a function of familial alcoholism: acute psychophysiological effects. AU - McCaul,M E, AU - Turkkan,J S, AU - Svikis,D S, AU - Bigelow,G E, PY - 1990/10/1/pubmed PY - 1990/10/1/medline PY - 1990/10/1/entrez SP - 704 EP - 12 JF - Alcoholism, clinical and experimental research JO - Alcohol. Clin. Exp. Res. VL - 14 IS - 5 N2 - Previous research has demonstrated response differences following administration of alcohol between adult males with a positive (FHP) versus negative (FHN) family history of alcoholism. These response differences are thought to reflect differences in vulnerability to dependence on alcohol. Thus, the role of positive family alcoholism history in increasing risk of addiction to a variety of drug classes might be studied by determining whether FHP subjects show different responses to drug classes other than alcohol. This was done in the present study by determining dose-effect functions for a variety of physiological (heart rate, skin conductance, skin temperature), subjective (analog mood and drug effect, Subjective High Assessment Scale), and psychomotor measures (hand tremor, body sway, Digit Symbol Substitution Test, eye-hand coordination, and numeric recall) in FHP and FHN college-aged males for secobarbital (0, 100, 200 mg by mouth) and ethanol (1 g/kg). FHP and FHN subjects were matched on light-to-moderate drinking patterns, anthropometric dimensions, age, years of schooling, and drug use. At equivalent blood alcohol levels family-history positive subjects reported greater effects of ethanol than did family-history negative subjects on almost all subjective measures. Following the high dose of secobarbital, FHP but not FHN subjects showed elevated subjective effects; these effects were substantially less and were evident in fewer measures than following ethanol. In contrast to effects on the subjective measures, ethanol and secobarbital produced comparable impairment in both groups of subjects for most psychomotor responses. Group differences were not obtained on any physiological measures.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) SN - 0145-6008 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/2264598/Alcohol_and_secobarbital_effects_as_a_function_of_familial_alcoholism:_acute_psychophysiological_effects_ L2 - https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/resolve/openurl?genre=article&sid=nlm:pubmed&issn=0145-6008&date=1990&volume=14&issue=5&spage=704 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -