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Preschool children's development in classic Montessori, supplemented Montessori, and conventional programs.
J Sch Psychol 2012; 50(3):379-401JS

Abstract

Research on the outcomes of Montessori education is scarce and results are inconsistent. One possible reason for the inconsistency is variations in Montessori implementation fidelity. To test whether outcomes vary according to implementation fidelity, we examined preschool children enrolled in high fidelity classic Montessori programs, lower fidelity Montessori programs that supplemented the program with conventional school activities, and, for comparison, conventional programs. Children were tested at the start and end of the school year on a range of social and academic skills. Although they performed no better in the fall, children in Classic Montessori programs, as compared with children in Supplemented Montessori and Conventional programs, showed significantly greater school-year gains on outcome measures of executive function, reading, math, vocabulary, and social problem-solving, suggesting that high fidelity Montessori implementation is associated with better outcomes than lower fidelity Montessori programs or conventional programs.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, 22904-4400, USA. lillard@virginia.edu

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22656079

Citation

Lillard, Angeline S.. "Preschool Children's Development in Classic Montessori, Supplemented Montessori, and Conventional Programs." Journal of School Psychology, vol. 50, no. 3, 2012, pp. 379-401.
Lillard AS. Preschool children's development in classic Montessori, supplemented Montessori, and conventional programs. J Sch Psychol. 2012;50(3):379-401.
Lillard, A. S. (2012). Preschool children's development in classic Montessori, supplemented Montessori, and conventional programs. Journal of School Psychology, 50(3), pp. 379-401. doi:10.1016/j.jsp.2012.01.001.
Lillard AS. Preschool Children's Development in Classic Montessori, Supplemented Montessori, and Conventional Programs. J Sch Psychol. 2012;50(3):379-401. PubMed PMID: 22656079.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Preschool children's development in classic Montessori, supplemented Montessori, and conventional programs. A1 - Lillard,Angeline S, Y1 - 2012/02/10/ PY - 2010/12/21/received PY - 2012/01/09/revised PY - 2012/01/12/accepted PY - 2012/6/5/entrez PY - 2012/6/5/pubmed PY - 2012/9/1/medline SP - 379 EP - 401 JF - Journal of school psychology JO - J Sch Psychol VL - 50 IS - 3 N2 - Research on the outcomes of Montessori education is scarce and results are inconsistent. One possible reason for the inconsistency is variations in Montessori implementation fidelity. To test whether outcomes vary according to implementation fidelity, we examined preschool children enrolled in high fidelity classic Montessori programs, lower fidelity Montessori programs that supplemented the program with conventional school activities, and, for comparison, conventional programs. Children were tested at the start and end of the school year on a range of social and academic skills. Although they performed no better in the fall, children in Classic Montessori programs, as compared with children in Supplemented Montessori and Conventional programs, showed significantly greater school-year gains on outcome measures of executive function, reading, math, vocabulary, and social problem-solving, suggesting that high fidelity Montessori implementation is associated with better outcomes than lower fidelity Montessori programs or conventional programs. SN - 1873-3506 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22656079/Preschool_children L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0022-4405(12)00003-9 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -