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Dengue infections in travellers.
Paediatr Int Child Health. 2012 May; 32 Suppl 1:28-32.PI

Abstract

Dengue has been designated a major international public health problem by the World Health Organization (WHO). It is endemic in most tropical and sub-tropical countries, which are also popular tourist destinations. Travellers are not only at significant risk of acquiring dengue but they also contribute to its spread to non-endemic regions. Furthermore, they may serve as sentinels to alert the international community to epidemics in dengue-endemic regions. GeoSentinel, a global surveillance network, monitors all travel-related illnesses and estimates that dengue accounts for 2% of all illness in travellers returning from dengue-endemic regions. In fact, in travellers returning from South-east Asia, dengue is now a more frequent cause of febrile illness than malaria. Dengue-infected travellers returning home to countries where the vector exists can place the local population at risk of further spread of the disease with subsequent autochthonous cycles of infection. The true incidence of dengue amongst travellers may be underestimated because of variability in reporting requirements in different countries and under-diagnosis owing to the non-specific clinical presentation of the disease. Risk factors for acquiring dengue include duration of stay, season of travel and epidemic activity at the destination. Any pre-travel advice on the risks of developing dengue infections should consider these factors.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Institute of Public Health, University of Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 365, Heidelberg, Germany. epvws@pacific.net.sg

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22668447

Citation

Wilder-Smith, Annelies. "Dengue Infections in Travellers." Paediatrics and International Child Health, vol. 32 Suppl 1, 2012, pp. 28-32.
Wilder-Smith A. Dengue infections in travellers. Paediatr Int Child Health. 2012;32 Suppl 1:28-32.
Wilder-Smith, A. (2012). Dengue infections in travellers. Paediatrics and International Child Health, 32 Suppl 1, 28-32. https://doi.org/10.1179/2046904712Z.00000000050
Wilder-Smith A. Dengue Infections in Travellers. Paediatr Int Child Health. 2012;32 Suppl 1:28-32. PubMed PMID: 22668447.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Dengue infections in travellers. A1 - Wilder-Smith,Annelies, PY - 2012/6/7/entrez PY - 2012/6/8/pubmed PY - 2012/10/17/medline SP - 28 EP - 32 JF - Paediatrics and international child health JO - Paediatr Int Child Health VL - 32 Suppl 1 N2 - Dengue has been designated a major international public health problem by the World Health Organization (WHO). It is endemic in most tropical and sub-tropical countries, which are also popular tourist destinations. Travellers are not only at significant risk of acquiring dengue but they also contribute to its spread to non-endemic regions. Furthermore, they may serve as sentinels to alert the international community to epidemics in dengue-endemic regions. GeoSentinel, a global surveillance network, monitors all travel-related illnesses and estimates that dengue accounts for 2% of all illness in travellers returning from dengue-endemic regions. In fact, in travellers returning from South-east Asia, dengue is now a more frequent cause of febrile illness than malaria. Dengue-infected travellers returning home to countries where the vector exists can place the local population at risk of further spread of the disease with subsequent autochthonous cycles of infection. The true incidence of dengue amongst travellers may be underestimated because of variability in reporting requirements in different countries and under-diagnosis owing to the non-specific clinical presentation of the disease. Risk factors for acquiring dengue include duration of stay, season of travel and epidemic activity at the destination. Any pre-travel advice on the risks of developing dengue infections should consider these factors. SN - 2046-9055 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22668447/Dengue_infections_in_travellers_ L2 - https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1179/2046904712Z.00000000050 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -