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Borderline personality features and development of psychosis in an 'ultra high risk' (UHR) population: a case control study.
Early Interv Psychiatry. 2012 Aug; 6(3):247-55.EI

Abstract

AIMS

There is clinical uncertainty as to whether borderline personality disorder (BPD) traits in those with an 'at risk mental state' have an effect on the risk of 'transition' to psychosis. We aimed to investigate the relationship between baseline BPD features, risk of transition and type of psychotic disorder experienced.

METHOD

This is a case-control study of 'ultra high risk' (UHR) for psychosis patients treated at the clinic, between 2004 and 2007. 'Cases' were UHR individuals who made the 'transition' to full threshold psychotic disorder within 24 months; 'control' group was a matched UHR sample who had not developed a psychotic disorder at 24 months. Individuals were matched on time of entry to the clinic, age and gender. Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders, fourth edition (DSM-IV) BPD features were assessed from clinical assessments using a structured instrument (Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis II Disorder for BPD (SCID-II BPD)). Psychosis diagnosis following transition was rated from the clinical files using the operational criteria in studies of psychotic illness (OPCRIT) computer algorithm. The number of BPD traits and number with full threshold BPD were compared in those who developed psychosis and those who did not.

RESULTS

We analysed data from 48 cases and 48 controls. There was no statistically significant difference in the rate of transition to psychosis for those with baseline full-threshold BPD, compared with those without BPD. The number of BPD traits or number with full threshold BPD did not differ by psychosis diagnosis grouping.

CONCLUSIONS

Co-occurring BPD or BPD features does not appear to strongly influence the risk of short-term transition to psychosis or the risk of developing a non-affective psychotic disorder in this population.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Orygen Youth Health Research Centre, Centre for Youth Mental Health, The University of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. andyt@unimelb.edu.auNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22672502

Citation

Thompson, Andrew, et al. "Borderline Personality Features and Development of Psychosis in an 'ultra High Risk' (UHR) Population: a Case Control Study." Early Intervention in Psychiatry, vol. 6, no. 3, 2012, pp. 247-55.
Thompson A, Nelson B, Bechdolf A, et al. Borderline personality features and development of psychosis in an 'ultra high risk' (UHR) population: a case control study. Early Interv Psychiatry. 2012;6(3):247-55.
Thompson, A., Nelson, B., Bechdolf, A., Chanen, A. M., Domingues, I., McDougall, E., & Yung, A. R. (2012). Borderline personality features and development of psychosis in an 'ultra high risk' (UHR) population: a case control study. Early Intervention in Psychiatry, 6(3), 247-55. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1751-7893.2012.00365.x
Thompson A, et al. Borderline Personality Features and Development of Psychosis in an 'ultra High Risk' (UHR) Population: a Case Control Study. Early Interv Psychiatry. 2012;6(3):247-55. PubMed PMID: 22672502.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Borderline personality features and development of psychosis in an 'ultra high risk' (UHR) population: a case control study. AU - Thompson,Andrew, AU - Nelson,Barnaby, AU - Bechdolf,Andreas, AU - Chanen,Andrew M, AU - Domingues,Isabel, AU - McDougall,Emma, AU - Yung,Alison R, Y1 - 2012/06/05/ PY - 2012/6/8/entrez PY - 2012/6/8/pubmed PY - 2012/12/18/medline SP - 247 EP - 55 JF - Early intervention in psychiatry JO - Early Interv Psychiatry VL - 6 IS - 3 N2 - AIMS: There is clinical uncertainty as to whether borderline personality disorder (BPD) traits in those with an 'at risk mental state' have an effect on the risk of 'transition' to psychosis. We aimed to investigate the relationship between baseline BPD features, risk of transition and type of psychotic disorder experienced. METHOD: This is a case-control study of 'ultra high risk' (UHR) for psychosis patients treated at the clinic, between 2004 and 2007. 'Cases' were UHR individuals who made the 'transition' to full threshold psychotic disorder within 24 months; 'control' group was a matched UHR sample who had not developed a psychotic disorder at 24 months. Individuals were matched on time of entry to the clinic, age and gender. Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders, fourth edition (DSM-IV) BPD features were assessed from clinical assessments using a structured instrument (Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis II Disorder for BPD (SCID-II BPD)). Psychosis diagnosis following transition was rated from the clinical files using the operational criteria in studies of psychotic illness (OPCRIT) computer algorithm. The number of BPD traits and number with full threshold BPD were compared in those who developed psychosis and those who did not. RESULTS: We analysed data from 48 cases and 48 controls. There was no statistically significant difference in the rate of transition to psychosis for those with baseline full-threshold BPD, compared with those without BPD. The number of BPD traits or number with full threshold BPD did not differ by psychosis diagnosis grouping. CONCLUSIONS: Co-occurring BPD or BPD features does not appear to strongly influence the risk of short-term transition to psychosis or the risk of developing a non-affective psychotic disorder in this population. SN - 1751-7893 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22672502/Borderline_personality_features_and_development_of_psychosis_in_an_'ultra_high_risk'__UHR__population:_a_case_control_study_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1751-7893.2012.00365.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -