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Hemolysis induced by an extreme mountain ultra-marathon is not associated with a decrease in total red blood cell volume.
Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2014 Feb; 24(1):18-27.SJ

Abstract

Prolonged running is known to induce hemolysis. It has been suggested that hemolysis may lead to a significant loss of red blood cells; however, its actual impact on the erythrocyte pool is unknown. Here, we test the hypothesis that prolonged running with high hemolytic potential decreases total red blood cell volume (RCV). Hemolysis (n = 22) and RCV (n = 19) were quantified in ultra-marathon runners before and after a 166-km long mountain ultra-endurance marathon (RUN) with 9500 m of altitude gain/loss. Assessment of total hemoglobin mass (Hbmass) and RCV was performed using a carbon monoxide rebreathing technique. RUN induced a marked acute-phase response and promoted hemolysis, as shown by a decrease in serum haptoglobin (P < 0.05). Elevated serum erythropoietin concentration and reticulocyte count after RUN were indicative of erythropoietic stimulation. Following RUN, runners experienced hemodilution, mediated by a large plasma volume expansion and associated with a large increase in plasma aldosterone. However, neither Hbmass nor RCV were found to be altered after RUN. Our findings indicate that mechanical/physiological stress associated with RUN promotes hemolysis but this has no impact on total erythrocyte volume. We therefore suggest that exercise 'anemia' is entirely due to plasma volume expansion and not to a concomitant decrease in RCV.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Medical Department, National School for Skiing and Mountaineering, Site of the National School for Mountain Sports, Chamonix, France.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22672635

Citation

Robach, P, et al. "Hemolysis Induced By an Extreme Mountain Ultra-marathon Is Not Associated With a Decrease in Total Red Blood Cell Volume." Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports, vol. 24, no. 1, 2014, pp. 18-27.
Robach P, Boisson RC, Vincent L, et al. Hemolysis induced by an extreme mountain ultra-marathon is not associated with a decrease in total red blood cell volume. Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2014;24(1):18-27.
Robach, P., Boisson, R. C., Vincent, L., Lundby, C., Moutereau, S., Gergelé, L., Michel, N., Duthil, E., Féasson, L., & Millet, G. Y. (2014). Hemolysis induced by an extreme mountain ultra-marathon is not associated with a decrease in total red blood cell volume. Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports, 24(1), 18-27. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1600-0838.2012.01481.x
Robach P, et al. Hemolysis Induced By an Extreme Mountain Ultra-marathon Is Not Associated With a Decrease in Total Red Blood Cell Volume. Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2014;24(1):18-27. PubMed PMID: 22672635.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Hemolysis induced by an extreme mountain ultra-marathon is not associated with a decrease in total red blood cell volume. AU - Robach,P, AU - Boisson,R-C, AU - Vincent,L, AU - Lundby,C, AU - Moutereau,S, AU - Gergelé,L, AU - Michel,N, AU - Duthil,E, AU - Féasson,L, AU - Millet,G Y, Y1 - 2012/06/05/ PY - 2012/04/17/accepted PY - 2012/6/8/entrez PY - 2012/6/8/pubmed PY - 2014/9/30/medline KW - hemolysis KW - plasma volume KW - running KW - total red blood cell volume KW - ultra-endurance SP - 18 EP - 27 JF - Scandinavian journal of medicine & science in sports JO - Scand J Med Sci Sports VL - 24 IS - 1 N2 - Prolonged running is known to induce hemolysis. It has been suggested that hemolysis may lead to a significant loss of red blood cells; however, its actual impact on the erythrocyte pool is unknown. Here, we test the hypothesis that prolonged running with high hemolytic potential decreases total red blood cell volume (RCV). Hemolysis (n = 22) and RCV (n = 19) were quantified in ultra-marathon runners before and after a 166-km long mountain ultra-endurance marathon (RUN) with 9500 m of altitude gain/loss. Assessment of total hemoglobin mass (Hbmass) and RCV was performed using a carbon monoxide rebreathing technique. RUN induced a marked acute-phase response and promoted hemolysis, as shown by a decrease in serum haptoglobin (P < 0.05). Elevated serum erythropoietin concentration and reticulocyte count after RUN were indicative of erythropoietic stimulation. Following RUN, runners experienced hemodilution, mediated by a large plasma volume expansion and associated with a large increase in plasma aldosterone. However, neither Hbmass nor RCV were found to be altered after RUN. Our findings indicate that mechanical/physiological stress associated with RUN promotes hemolysis but this has no impact on total erythrocyte volume. We therefore suggest that exercise 'anemia' is entirely due to plasma volume expansion and not to a concomitant decrease in RCV. SN - 1600-0838 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22672635/Hemolysis_induced_by_an_extreme_mountain_ultra_marathon_is_not_associated_with_a_decrease_in_total_red_blood_cell_volume_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1600-0838.2012.01481.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -