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Rising mortality from injury in urban China: demographic burden, underlying causes and policy implications.

Abstract

In urban China, mortality from injuries has increased over the past five decades. By contrast, life expectancy has continued to increase and has come to nearly equal life expectancy in developed countries. Currently, most of the life expectancy lost due to injury (65%) in urban China would be recovered if injury rates were the same as in countries with low injury-related mortality. Fundamentally, the rising trend in urban injury mortality in China reflects a continued focus on injury treatment rather than prevention in the face of fast socioeconomic development and increasing exposure to risk factors for injury. Despite improved injury prevention legislation and a "Safe Community" campaign, urban China needs to modify its approach to urban injury management and focus on prevention. The gap between urban China and countries with low injury mortality can be closed by means of legislation, strengthened law enforcement and the establishment of safer communities. Risks affecting children and migrants deserve greater attention, and the government needs to allocate more resources to injury prevention, especially to urban areas in the central-west region of China. Based on the population size of urban China, measures for the prevention of injury mortality would save an annual 436.4 million years of life.

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    MeSH

    Adolescent
    Adult
    Aged
    Aged, 80 and over
    Child
    Child, Preschool
    China
    Female
    Health Policy
    Humans
    Infant
    Infant, Newborn
    Life Expectancy
    Male
    Middle Aged
    Mortality
    Public Health
    Risk Assessment
    Risk Factors
    Urban Population
    Wounds and Injuries
    Young Adult

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    22690036

    Citation

    TY - JOUR T1 - Rising mortality from injury in urban China: demographic burden, underlying causes and policy implications. AU - Zhao,Jiaying, AU - Tu,Edward Jow-Ching, AU - McMurray,Christine, AU - Sleigh,Adrian, Y1 - 2012/04/23/ PY - 2011/7/30/received PY - 2011/12/13/revised PY - 2011/12/14/accepted PY - 2012/4/23/epublish PY - 2012/6/13/entrez PY - 2012/6/13/pubmed PY - 2012/10/30/medline SP - 461 EP - 7 JF - Bulletin of the World Health Organization JO - Bull. World Health Organ. VL - 90 IS - 6 N2 - In urban China, mortality from injuries has increased over the past five decades. By contrast, life expectancy has continued to increase and has come to nearly equal life expectancy in developed countries. Currently, most of the life expectancy lost due to injury (65%) in urban China would be recovered if injury rates were the same as in countries with low injury-related mortality. Fundamentally, the rising trend in urban injury mortality in China reflects a continued focus on injury treatment rather than prevention in the face of fast socioeconomic development and increasing exposure to risk factors for injury. Despite improved injury prevention legislation and a "Safe Community" campaign, urban China needs to modify its approach to urban injury management and focus on prevention. The gap between urban China and countries with low injury mortality can be closed by means of legislation, strengthened law enforcement and the establishment of safer communities. Risks affecting children and migrants deserve greater attention, and the government needs to allocate more resources to injury prevention, especially to urban areas in the central-west region of China. Based on the population size of urban China, measures for the prevention of injury mortality would save an annual 436.4 million years of life. SN - 1564-0604 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22690036/Rising_mortality_from_injury_in_urban_China:_demographic_burden_underlying_causes_and_policy_implications_ L2 - http://www.scielosp.org/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=BLT.11.093849&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en ER -