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Neurogenic and psychogenic acute postconcussion symptoms can be identified after mild traumatic brain injury.
J Head Trauma Rehabil. 2013 Sep-Oct; 28(5):397-405.JH

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

As provenance of postconcussion symptoms after mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is controversial, with similar rates found in other populations, we aimed to identify postconcussion symptoms specific to mTBI compared with controls. We also compared differences between complicated and uncomplicated mTBIs.

SETTING

Hospital emergency department.

PARTICIPANTS

Adult individuals (34 individuals with complicated mTBI, 76 individuals with uncomplicated mTBI, and 47 orthopedic controls) who sought care in the emergency department and were consecutively recruited by post at 2 weeks postinjury.

MAIN MEASURES

Rivermead Postconcussion Symptom Questionnaire. Preinjury factors were used as covariates.

RESULTS

Compared with orthopedic controls, complicated mTBI group reported greater severity of headaches, dizziness, and nausea, as well as concentration difficulties, suggesting that these are neurogenic. Severity of other symptoms measured on the Rivermead Postconcussion Symptom Questionnaire was not significantly different between these groups, suggesting that these are psychogenic. Differences were evident between the 2 mTBI samples on the items of dizziness, nausea, fatigue, sleep disturbance, and concentration difficulties.

CONCLUSIONS

Neurogenic and psychogenic postconcussion symptoms were identified at the acute-phase postinjury. Findings suggest that treating persons with mTBI as a homogenous sample is not prudent. This should inform prognostic models and follow-up support offered after leaving the emergency department.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Centre for Clinical Neuropsychological Research, University of Exeter (Drs Mounce, Haslam, and Williams); Emergency Department, Royal Devon and Exeter Foundation Trust (Mr Harris), Exeter, United Kingdom; and School of Psychology, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia (Drs. Jones and Jetten).No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22691962

Citation

Mounce, Luke T A., et al. "Neurogenic and Psychogenic Acute Postconcussion Symptoms Can Be Identified After Mild Traumatic Brain Injury." The Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation, vol. 28, no. 5, 2013, pp. 397-405.
Mounce LT, Williams WH, Jones JM, et al. Neurogenic and psychogenic acute postconcussion symptoms can be identified after mild traumatic brain injury. J Head Trauma Rehabil. 2013;28(5):397-405.
Mounce, L. T., Williams, W. H., Jones, J. M., Harris, A., Haslam, S. A., & Jetten, J. (2013). Neurogenic and psychogenic acute postconcussion symptoms can be identified after mild traumatic brain injury. The Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation, 28(5), 397-405. https://doi.org/10.1097/HTR.0b013e318252dd75
Mounce LT, et al. Neurogenic and Psychogenic Acute Postconcussion Symptoms Can Be Identified After Mild Traumatic Brain Injury. J Head Trauma Rehabil. 2013 Sep-Oct;28(5):397-405. PubMed PMID: 22691962.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Neurogenic and psychogenic acute postconcussion symptoms can be identified after mild traumatic brain injury. AU - Mounce,Luke T A, AU - Williams,W Huw, AU - Jones,Janelle M, AU - Harris,Adrian, AU - Haslam,S Alexander, AU - Jetten,Jolanda, PY - 2012/6/14/entrez PY - 2012/6/14/pubmed PY - 2014/4/23/medline SP - 397 EP - 405 JF - The Journal of head trauma rehabilitation JO - J Head Trauma Rehabil VL - 28 IS - 5 N2 - OBJECTIVES: As provenance of postconcussion symptoms after mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is controversial, with similar rates found in other populations, we aimed to identify postconcussion symptoms specific to mTBI compared with controls. We also compared differences between complicated and uncomplicated mTBIs. SETTING: Hospital emergency department. PARTICIPANTS: Adult individuals (34 individuals with complicated mTBI, 76 individuals with uncomplicated mTBI, and 47 orthopedic controls) who sought care in the emergency department and were consecutively recruited by post at 2 weeks postinjury. MAIN MEASURES: Rivermead Postconcussion Symptom Questionnaire. Preinjury factors were used as covariates. RESULTS: Compared with orthopedic controls, complicated mTBI group reported greater severity of headaches, dizziness, and nausea, as well as concentration difficulties, suggesting that these are neurogenic. Severity of other symptoms measured on the Rivermead Postconcussion Symptom Questionnaire was not significantly different between these groups, suggesting that these are psychogenic. Differences were evident between the 2 mTBI samples on the items of dizziness, nausea, fatigue, sleep disturbance, and concentration difficulties. CONCLUSIONS: Neurogenic and psychogenic postconcussion symptoms were identified at the acute-phase postinjury. Findings suggest that treating persons with mTBI as a homogenous sample is not prudent. This should inform prognostic models and follow-up support offered after leaving the emergency department. SN - 1550-509X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22691962/Neurogenic_and_psychogenic_acute_postconcussion_symptoms_can_be_identified_after_mild_traumatic_brain_injury_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1097/HTR.0b013e318252dd75 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -