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Pregnant women have attenuated innate interferon responses to 2009 pandemic influenza A virus subtype H1N1.
J Infect Dis 2012; 206(5):646-53JI

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Pregnant women are considered to have a high risk for influenza virus infection, although little is known about the biological reasons for this risk. Antiviral immunity is critical during influenza virus infection, and understanding the changes that occur during pregnancy and the effect of vaccination is essential for improving health outcomes for mother and baby.

METHODS

Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were isolated from 26 healthy, nonpregnant women and 28 healthy pregnant women and cultured with 2009 pandemic influenza A virus subtype H1N1 (H1N1/09). Protein concentrations of interferon α (IFN-α), IFN-λ, and IFN-γ were measured from culture supernatant. Messenger RNA expression of protein kinase R (PKR) and Toll-like receptors 3, 7, and 9 was also measured from cell lysates.

RESULTS

PBMCs from pregnant women produced significantly less IFN-α (median level, 114.06 pg/mL [range, 51.48-394.9]) and IFN-λ (median level, 30.65 pg/mL [range, 0-260]), compared with PBMCs from nonpregnant women (median level, 800.38 pg/mL [range, 259-1458] and 479.87 pg/mL [257.1-1113], respectively; P < .01). PKR expression was also significantly reduced in PBMCs from pregnant women (P < .05). Vaccination significantly improved innate and adaptive immunity in pregnancy (P < .01).

CONCLUSION

PBMCs from nonvaccinated pregnant women have attenuated antiviral immunity following H1N1/09 stimulation, but vaccination improves this response. These novel findings help improve understanding of the increased susceptibility and disease severity to influenza virus infection during pregnancy and the importance of influenza vaccination.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Centre for Asthma and Respiratory Diseases, School of Medicine and Public Health, The University of Newcastle, Australia.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22693225

Citation

Forbes, Rebecca L., et al. "Pregnant Women Have Attenuated Innate Interferon Responses to 2009 Pandemic Influenza a Virus Subtype H1N1." The Journal of Infectious Diseases, vol. 206, no. 5, 2012, pp. 646-53.
Forbes RL, Wark PA, Murphy VE, et al. Pregnant women have attenuated innate interferon responses to 2009 pandemic influenza A virus subtype H1N1. J Infect Dis. 2012;206(5):646-53.
Forbes, R. L., Wark, P. A., Murphy, V. E., & Gibson, P. G. (2012). Pregnant women have attenuated innate interferon responses to 2009 pandemic influenza A virus subtype H1N1. The Journal of Infectious Diseases, 206(5), pp. 646-53. doi:10.1093/infdis/jis377.
Forbes RL, et al. Pregnant Women Have Attenuated Innate Interferon Responses to 2009 Pandemic Influenza a Virus Subtype H1N1. J Infect Dis. 2012 Sep 1;206(5):646-53. PubMed PMID: 22693225.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Pregnant women have attenuated innate interferon responses to 2009 pandemic influenza A virus subtype H1N1. AU - Forbes,Rebecca L, AU - Wark,Peter A B, AU - Murphy,Vanessa E, AU - Gibson,Peter G, Y1 - 2012/06/12/ PY - 2012/6/14/entrez PY - 2012/6/14/pubmed PY - 2013/1/9/medline SP - 646 EP - 53 JF - The Journal of infectious diseases JO - J. Infect. Dis. VL - 206 IS - 5 N2 - BACKGROUND: Pregnant women are considered to have a high risk for influenza virus infection, although little is known about the biological reasons for this risk. Antiviral immunity is critical during influenza virus infection, and understanding the changes that occur during pregnancy and the effect of vaccination is essential for improving health outcomes for mother and baby. METHODS: Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were isolated from 26 healthy, nonpregnant women and 28 healthy pregnant women and cultured with 2009 pandemic influenza A virus subtype H1N1 (H1N1/09). Protein concentrations of interferon α (IFN-α), IFN-λ, and IFN-γ were measured from culture supernatant. Messenger RNA expression of protein kinase R (PKR) and Toll-like receptors 3, 7, and 9 was also measured from cell lysates. RESULTS: PBMCs from pregnant women produced significantly less IFN-α (median level, 114.06 pg/mL [range, 51.48-394.9]) and IFN-λ (median level, 30.65 pg/mL [range, 0-260]), compared with PBMCs from nonpregnant women (median level, 800.38 pg/mL [range, 259-1458] and 479.87 pg/mL [257.1-1113], respectively; P < .01). PKR expression was also significantly reduced in PBMCs from pregnant women (P < .05). Vaccination significantly improved innate and adaptive immunity in pregnancy (P < .01). CONCLUSION: PBMCs from nonvaccinated pregnant women have attenuated antiviral immunity following H1N1/09 stimulation, but vaccination improves this response. These novel findings help improve understanding of the increased susceptibility and disease severity to influenza virus infection during pregnancy and the importance of influenza vaccination. SN - 1537-6613 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22693225/Pregnant_women_have_attenuated_innate_interferon_responses_to_2009_pandemic_influenza_A_virus_subtype_H1N1_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/jid/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/infdis/jis377 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -