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Angiographically-assessed coronary artery disease associates with HDL particle size in women.
Atherosclerosis. 2012 Aug; 223(2):359-64.A

Abstract

It has been suggested that a reduced HDL particle size could be another feature of the atherogenic dyslipidemia found among viscerally obese subjects.

OBJECTIVE

To investigate, in women, the relationship between HDL particle size and coronary artery disease (CAD).

METHODS

Average HDL particle size was measured in a sample of 239 women on whom CAD was assessed by angiography.

RESULTS

Overall, women who had CAD were characterized by a deteriorated fasting metabolic risk profile, which was accompanied by smaller HDL particles compared to women without CAD (80.4 ± 2.2 Å vs. 81.5 ± 2.7 Å, p < 0.01). In addition, a reduced HDL particle size was a significant correlate of several features of the atherogenic metabolic profile of abdominal obesity such as increased triglyceride and apolipoprotein B concentrations, decreased HDL cholesterol levels, an elevated cholesterol/HDL cholesterol ratio and hyperinsulinemia and was also associated with an increased waist circumference (0.13≤|r|≤0.21, p < 0.05). Odds ratio of being affected by CAD was increased by 2.5-fold (95% CI: 1.4-4.5; p < 0.01) among women with smaller HDL particles compared to women with larger HDL particles. Finally, women characterized by the presence of the NCEP-ATP III clinical criteria or by hypertriglyceridemic waist were characterized by smaller HDL particles compared to women without these clinical phenotypes (p < 0.05).

CONCLUSION

HDL particle size appears to be another relevant feature of a dysmetabolic state which is related to CAD risk in women.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Centre de recherche de l'Institut universitaire de cardiologie et de pneumologie de Québec, Québec (Québec), Canada.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22695528

Citation

Blackburn, Patricia, et al. "Angiographically-assessed Coronary Artery Disease Associates With HDL Particle Size in Women." Atherosclerosis, vol. 223, no. 2, 2012, pp. 359-64.
Blackburn P, Lemieux I, Lamarche B, et al. Angiographically-assessed coronary artery disease associates with HDL particle size in women. Atherosclerosis. 2012;223(2):359-64.
Blackburn, P., Lemieux, I., Lamarche, B., Bergeron, J., Perron, P., Tremblay, G., Gaudet, D., & Després, J. P. (2012). Angiographically-assessed coronary artery disease associates with HDL particle size in women. Atherosclerosis, 223(2), 359-64. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.atherosclerosis.2012.05.016
Blackburn P, et al. Angiographically-assessed Coronary Artery Disease Associates With HDL Particle Size in Women. Atherosclerosis. 2012;223(2):359-64. PubMed PMID: 22695528.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Angiographically-assessed coronary artery disease associates with HDL particle size in women. AU - Blackburn,Patricia, AU - Lemieux,Isabelle, AU - Lamarche,Benoît, AU - Bergeron,Jean, AU - Perron,Patrice, AU - Tremblay,Gérald, AU - Gaudet,Daniel, AU - Després,Jean-Pierre, Y1 - 2012/05/24/ PY - 2010/11/16/received PY - 2012/05/02/revised PY - 2012/05/15/accepted PY - 2012/6/15/entrez PY - 2012/6/15/pubmed PY - 2013/1/4/medline SP - 359 EP - 64 JF - Atherosclerosis JO - Atherosclerosis VL - 223 IS - 2 N2 - UNLABELLED: It has been suggested that a reduced HDL particle size could be another feature of the atherogenic dyslipidemia found among viscerally obese subjects. OBJECTIVE: To investigate, in women, the relationship between HDL particle size and coronary artery disease (CAD). METHODS: Average HDL particle size was measured in a sample of 239 women on whom CAD was assessed by angiography. RESULTS: Overall, women who had CAD were characterized by a deteriorated fasting metabolic risk profile, which was accompanied by smaller HDL particles compared to women without CAD (80.4 ± 2.2 Å vs. 81.5 ± 2.7 Å, p < 0.01). In addition, a reduced HDL particle size was a significant correlate of several features of the atherogenic metabolic profile of abdominal obesity such as increased triglyceride and apolipoprotein B concentrations, decreased HDL cholesterol levels, an elevated cholesterol/HDL cholesterol ratio and hyperinsulinemia and was also associated with an increased waist circumference (0.13≤|r|≤0.21, p < 0.05). Odds ratio of being affected by CAD was increased by 2.5-fold (95% CI: 1.4-4.5; p < 0.01) among women with smaller HDL particles compared to women with larger HDL particles. Finally, women characterized by the presence of the NCEP-ATP III clinical criteria or by hypertriglyceridemic waist were characterized by smaller HDL particles compared to women without these clinical phenotypes (p < 0.05). CONCLUSION: HDL particle size appears to be another relevant feature of a dysmetabolic state which is related to CAD risk in women. SN - 1879-1484 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22695528/Angiographically_assessed_coronary_artery_disease_associates_with_HDL_particle_size_in_women_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0021-9150(12)00326-7 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -