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Anodic Fenton process assisted by a microbial fuel cell for enhanced degradation of organic pollutants.
Water Res. 2012 Sep 15; 46(14):4371-8.WR

Abstract

The electro-Fenton process is efficient for degradation of organic pollutants, but it suffers from the high operating costs due to the need of power investment. Here, a new anodic Fenton system is developed for energy-saving and efficient treatment of organic pollutants by incorporating microbial fuel cell (MFC) into an anodic Fenton process. This system is composed of an anodic Fenton reactor and a two-chamber air-cathode MFC. The power generated from a two-chamber MFC is used to drive the anodic Fenton process for Acid Orange 7 (AO7) degradation through accelerating in situ generation of Fe(2+) from sacrificial iron. The kinetic results show that the MFC-assisted anodic Fenton process system had a significantly higher pseudo-first-order rate constant than those for the chemical Fenton methods. The electrochemical analysis reveals that AO7 did not hinder the corrosion of iron. The anodic Fenton process was influenced by the MFC performance. It was also found that increasing dissolved oxygen in the cathode improved the MFC power density, which in turn enhanced the AO7 degradation rate. These clearly demonstrate that the anodic Fenton process could be integrated with MFC to develop a self-sustained system for cost-effective and energy-saving electrochemical wastewater treatment.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Chemistry, University of Science & Technology of China, Hefei 230026, China.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22698252

Citation

Liu, Xian-Wei, et al. "Anodic Fenton Process Assisted By a Microbial Fuel Cell for Enhanced Degradation of Organic Pollutants." Water Research, vol. 46, no. 14, 2012, pp. 4371-8.
Liu XW, Sun XF, Li DB, et al. Anodic Fenton process assisted by a microbial fuel cell for enhanced degradation of organic pollutants. Water Res. 2012;46(14):4371-8.
Liu, X. W., Sun, X. F., Li, D. B., Li, W. W., Huang, Y. X., Sheng, G. P., & Yu, H. Q. (2012). Anodic Fenton process assisted by a microbial fuel cell for enhanced degradation of organic pollutants. Water Research, 46(14), 4371-8. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.watres.2012.05.044
Liu XW, et al. Anodic Fenton Process Assisted By a Microbial Fuel Cell for Enhanced Degradation of Organic Pollutants. Water Res. 2012 Sep 15;46(14):4371-8. PubMed PMID: 22698252.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Anodic Fenton process assisted by a microbial fuel cell for enhanced degradation of organic pollutants. AU - Liu,Xian-Wei, AU - Sun,Xue-Fei, AU - Li,Dao-Bo, AU - Li,Wen-Wei, AU - Huang,Yu-Xi, AU - Sheng,Guo-Ping, AU - Yu,Han-Qing, Y1 - 2012/05/31/ PY - 2012/03/24/received PY - 2012/05/20/revised PY - 2012/05/22/accepted PY - 2012/6/16/entrez PY - 2012/6/16/pubmed PY - 2012/10/31/medline SP - 4371 EP - 8 JF - Water research JO - Water Res VL - 46 IS - 14 N2 - The electro-Fenton process is efficient for degradation of organic pollutants, but it suffers from the high operating costs due to the need of power investment. Here, a new anodic Fenton system is developed for energy-saving and efficient treatment of organic pollutants by incorporating microbial fuel cell (MFC) into an anodic Fenton process. This system is composed of an anodic Fenton reactor and a two-chamber air-cathode MFC. The power generated from a two-chamber MFC is used to drive the anodic Fenton process for Acid Orange 7 (AO7) degradation through accelerating in situ generation of Fe(2+) from sacrificial iron. The kinetic results show that the MFC-assisted anodic Fenton process system had a significantly higher pseudo-first-order rate constant than those for the chemical Fenton methods. The electrochemical analysis reveals that AO7 did not hinder the corrosion of iron. The anodic Fenton process was influenced by the MFC performance. It was also found that increasing dissolved oxygen in the cathode improved the MFC power density, which in turn enhanced the AO7 degradation rate. These clearly demonstrate that the anodic Fenton process could be integrated with MFC to develop a self-sustained system for cost-effective and energy-saving electrochemical wastewater treatment. SN - 1879-2448 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22698252/Anodic_Fenton_process_assisted_by_a_microbial_fuel_cell_for_enhanced_degradation_of_organic_pollutants_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0043-1354(12)00382-X DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -