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Expertise is perceived from both sound and body movement in musical performance.
Hum Mov Sci. 2012 Oct; 31(5):1137-50.HM

Abstract

Music is a rich form of nonverbal communication, in which the movements that expert musicians make during performance can influence the perception of expressive and structural features of the music. Whether the actual skill of a musician is perceivable from vision of movement was examined. In Experiment 1, musicians and non-musicians rated performances by novice, intermediate and expert clarinettists from point-light animations of their movements, sound recordings, or both. Performances by clarinettists of more advanced skill level were rated significantly higher from vision of movements, although this effect was stronger when sound was also presented. In Experiment 2, movements and sound from the novice and expert clarinettists' performances were switched for half the presentations, and were matched for the rest. Ratings of novice music were significantly higher when presented with expert movements, although the opposite was not found for expert sound presented with novice movements. No perceptual effect of raters' own level of musicianship was found in either experiment. These results suggest that expertise is perceivable from vision of musicians' body movements, although perception of skill from sound is dominant. The results from Experiment 2 further indicate a cross-modal effect of vision and audition on the perception of musical expertise.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Music and Sonic Arts, Queen's University Belfast, Belfast, UK. m.rodger@qub.ac.ukNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22698837

Citation

Rodger, Matthew W M., et al. "Expertise Is Perceived From Both Sound and Body Movement in Musical Performance." Human Movement Science, vol. 31, no. 5, 2012, pp. 1137-50.
Rodger MW, Craig CM, O'Modhrain S. Expertise is perceived from both sound and body movement in musical performance. Hum Mov Sci. 2012;31(5):1137-50.
Rodger, M. W., Craig, C. M., & O'Modhrain, S. (2012). Expertise is perceived from both sound and body movement in musical performance. Human Movement Science, 31(5), 1137-50. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.humov.2012.02.012
Rodger MW, Craig CM, O'Modhrain S. Expertise Is Perceived From Both Sound and Body Movement in Musical Performance. Hum Mov Sci. 2012;31(5):1137-50. PubMed PMID: 22698837.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Expertise is perceived from both sound and body movement in musical performance. AU - Rodger,Matthew W M, AU - Craig,Cathy M, AU - O'Modhrain,Sile, Y1 - 2012/06/12/ PY - 2011/08/02/received PY - 2011/12/19/revised PY - 2012/02/19/accepted PY - 2012/6/16/entrez PY - 2012/6/16/pubmed PY - 2013/5/18/medline SP - 1137 EP - 50 JF - Human movement science JO - Hum Mov Sci VL - 31 IS - 5 N2 - Music is a rich form of nonverbal communication, in which the movements that expert musicians make during performance can influence the perception of expressive and structural features of the music. Whether the actual skill of a musician is perceivable from vision of movement was examined. In Experiment 1, musicians and non-musicians rated performances by novice, intermediate and expert clarinettists from point-light animations of their movements, sound recordings, or both. Performances by clarinettists of more advanced skill level were rated significantly higher from vision of movements, although this effect was stronger when sound was also presented. In Experiment 2, movements and sound from the novice and expert clarinettists' performances were switched for half the presentations, and were matched for the rest. Ratings of novice music were significantly higher when presented with expert movements, although the opposite was not found for expert sound presented with novice movements. No perceptual effect of raters' own level of musicianship was found in either experiment. These results suggest that expertise is perceivable from vision of musicians' body movements, although perception of skill from sound is dominant. The results from Experiment 2 further indicate a cross-modal effect of vision and audition on the perception of musical expertise. SN - 1872-7646 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22698837/Expertise_is_perceived_from_both_sound_and_body_movement_in_musical_performance_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0167-9457(12)00037-1 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -