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Oral language and narrative skills in children with specific language impairment with and without literacy delay: a three-year longitudinal study.
Res Dev Disabil. 2012 Nov-Dec; 33(6):1857-70.RD

Abstract

This longitudinal study compared the development of oral language and more specifically narrative skills (storytelling and story retelling) in children with specific language impairment (SLI) with and without literacy delay. Therefore, 18 children with SLI and 18 matched controls with normal literacy were followed from the last year of kindergarten (mean age=5 years 5 months) until the beginning of grade 3 (mean age=8 years 1 month). Oral language tests measuring vocabulary, morphology, sentence and text comprehension and narrative skills were administered yearly. Based on first and third grade reading and spelling achievement, both groups were divided into a group with and a group without literacy problems. Results showed that the children with SLI and literacy delay had persistent oral language problems across all assessed language domains. The children with SLI and normal literacy skills scored also persistently low on vocabulary, morphology and story retelling skills. Only on listening comprehension and storytelling, they evolved towards the level of the control group. In conclusion, oral language skills in children with SLI and normal literacy skills remained in general poor, despite their intact literacy development during the first years of literacy instruction. Only for listening comprehension and storytelling, they improved, probably as a result of more print exposure.

Authors+Show Affiliations

ExpORL, Department of Neurosciences, Faculty of Medicine, KU Leuven, Belgium. vdwalle.ellen@gmail.comNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22699257

Citation

Vandewalle, Ellen, et al. "Oral Language and Narrative Skills in Children With Specific Language Impairment With and Without Literacy Delay: a Three-year Longitudinal Study." Research in Developmental Disabilities, vol. 33, no. 6, 2012, pp. 1857-70.
Vandewalle E, Boets B, Boons T, et al. Oral language and narrative skills in children with specific language impairment with and without literacy delay: a three-year longitudinal study. Res Dev Disabil. 2012;33(6):1857-70.
Vandewalle, E., Boets, B., Boons, T., Ghesquière, P., & Zink, I. (2012). Oral language and narrative skills in children with specific language impairment with and without literacy delay: a three-year longitudinal study. Research in Developmental Disabilities, 33(6), 1857-70. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ridd.2012.05.004
Vandewalle E, et al. Oral Language and Narrative Skills in Children With Specific Language Impairment With and Without Literacy Delay: a Three-year Longitudinal Study. Res Dev Disabil. 2012 Nov-Dec;33(6):1857-70. PubMed PMID: 22699257.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Oral language and narrative skills in children with specific language impairment with and without literacy delay: a three-year longitudinal study. AU - Vandewalle,Ellen, AU - Boets,Bart, AU - Boons,Tinne, AU - Ghesquière,Pol, AU - Zink,Inge, Y1 - 2012/06/12/ PY - 2012/03/23/received PY - 2012/05/01/accepted PY - 2012/6/16/entrez PY - 2012/6/16/pubmed PY - 2013/3/30/medline SP - 1857 EP - 70 JF - Research in developmental disabilities JO - Res Dev Disabil VL - 33 IS - 6 N2 - This longitudinal study compared the development of oral language and more specifically narrative skills (storytelling and story retelling) in children with specific language impairment (SLI) with and without literacy delay. Therefore, 18 children with SLI and 18 matched controls with normal literacy were followed from the last year of kindergarten (mean age=5 years 5 months) until the beginning of grade 3 (mean age=8 years 1 month). Oral language tests measuring vocabulary, morphology, sentence and text comprehension and narrative skills were administered yearly. Based on first and third grade reading and spelling achievement, both groups were divided into a group with and a group without literacy problems. Results showed that the children with SLI and literacy delay had persistent oral language problems across all assessed language domains. The children with SLI and normal literacy skills scored also persistently low on vocabulary, morphology and story retelling skills. Only on listening comprehension and storytelling, they evolved towards the level of the control group. In conclusion, oral language skills in children with SLI and normal literacy skills remained in general poor, despite their intact literacy development during the first years of literacy instruction. Only for listening comprehension and storytelling, they improved, probably as a result of more print exposure. SN - 1873-3379 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22699257/Oral_language_and_narrative_skills_in_children_with_specific_language_impairment_with_and_without_literacy_delay:_a_three_year_longitudinal_study_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0891-4222(12)00113-8 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -