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The effect of coffee consumption on serum lipids: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

Abstract

BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES

Numbers of epidemiological studies assessing coffee consumption and serum lipids have yielded inconsistent results. We aimed to evaluate the effects of coffee intake on serum lipids.

SUBJECTS/METHODS

We searched several English and Chinese electronic databases up to September 2011 for randomized controlled trials of coffee on serum lipids. Weighted mean effect size was calculated for net changes in serum lipids by using random-effect models or fixed-effect models. Subgroup and meta-regression analyses were conducted to explore possible explanations for heterogeneity among trials.

RESULTS

Twelve studies conducted in Western countries with a total of 1017 subjects were identified. Meta-analyses showed, on average, drinking coffee for 45 days was associated with an increase of 8.1 mg/dl (95% confidence interval (CI): 4.5, 11.6; P<0.001) for total cholesterol (TC), 5.4 mg/dl (95% CI: 1.4, 9.5; P=0.009) for low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and 12.6 mg/dl (95% CI: 3.5, 12.6; P=0.007) for triglyceride (TG). The increase in TC were greater in trials using unfiltered coffee and caffeinated coffee as the treatment group. Those who had hyperlipidemia were more sensitive to the cholesterol-raising effect of coffee. Meta-regression analysis revealed a positive dose-response relation between coffee intake and TC, LDL-C and TG.

CONCLUSION

The intake of coffee especially unfiltered coffee is contributed significantly to the increase in TC, LDL-C and TG, and the changes were related to the level of intake. Studies of coffee intake on serum lipids in Asian populations should be performed.

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  • Publisher Full Text
  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department of Nutrition and Food Hygiene, School of Public Health, Peking University Health Science Center, Beijing, China.

    , , ,

    Source

    MeSH

    Body Weight
    Caffeine
    Cholesterol, HDL
    Cholesterol, LDL
    Coffee
    Humans
    Hyperlipidemias
    Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
    Triglycerides

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Meta-Analysis
    Review

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    22713771

    Citation

    Cai, L, et al. "The Effect of Coffee Consumption On Serum Lipids: a Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials." European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 66, no. 8, 2012, pp. 872-7.
    Cai L, Ma D, Zhang Y, et al. The effect of coffee consumption on serum lipids: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. Eur J Clin Nutr. 2012;66(8):872-7.
    Cai, L., Ma, D., Zhang, Y., Liu, Z., & Wang, P. (2012). The effect of coffee consumption on serum lipids: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 66(8), pp. 872-7. doi:10.1038/ejcn.2012.68.
    Cai L, et al. The Effect of Coffee Consumption On Serum Lipids: a Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials. Eur J Clin Nutr. 2012;66(8):872-7. PubMed PMID: 22713771.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - The effect of coffee consumption on serum lipids: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. AU - Cai,L, AU - Ma,D, AU - Zhang,Y, AU - Liu,Z, AU - Wang,P, Y1 - 2012/06/20/ PY - 2012/6/21/entrez PY - 2012/6/21/pubmed PY - 2012/12/12/medline SP - 872 EP - 7 JF - European journal of clinical nutrition JO - Eur J Clin Nutr VL - 66 IS - 8 N2 - BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: Numbers of epidemiological studies assessing coffee consumption and serum lipids have yielded inconsistent results. We aimed to evaluate the effects of coffee intake on serum lipids. SUBJECTS/METHODS: We searched several English and Chinese electronic databases up to September 2011 for randomized controlled trials of coffee on serum lipids. Weighted mean effect size was calculated for net changes in serum lipids by using random-effect models or fixed-effect models. Subgroup and meta-regression analyses were conducted to explore possible explanations for heterogeneity among trials. RESULTS: Twelve studies conducted in Western countries with a total of 1017 subjects were identified. Meta-analyses showed, on average, drinking coffee for 45 days was associated with an increase of 8.1 mg/dl (95% confidence interval (CI): 4.5, 11.6; P<0.001) for total cholesterol (TC), 5.4 mg/dl (95% CI: 1.4, 9.5; P=0.009) for low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and 12.6 mg/dl (95% CI: 3.5, 12.6; P=0.007) for triglyceride (TG). The increase in TC were greater in trials using unfiltered coffee and caffeinated coffee as the treatment group. Those who had hyperlipidemia were more sensitive to the cholesterol-raising effect of coffee. Meta-regression analysis revealed a positive dose-response relation between coffee intake and TC, LDL-C and TG. CONCLUSION: The intake of coffee especially unfiltered coffee is contributed significantly to the increase in TC, LDL-C and TG, and the changes were related to the level of intake. Studies of coffee intake on serum lipids in Asian populations should be performed. SN - 1476-5640 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22713771/full_citation L2 - http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/ejcn.2012.68 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -