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Fruit and vegetable intake and bone mass in Chinese adolescents, young and postmenopausal women.
Public Health Nutr 2013; 16(1):78-86PH

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Previous studies showed an inconsistent association of fruit and vegetable consumption with bone health. We assessed the associations in Chinese adolescents, young and postmenopausal women.

DESIGN

A cross-sectional study conducted in China during July 2009 to May 2010.

SETTING

Bone mineral density (BMD) and content (BMC) at the whole body, lumbar spine and left hip were measured with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Dietary intakes were assessed using an FFQ. All these values were separately standardized into Z-scores in each population subgroup.

SUBJECTS

One hundred and ten boys and 112 girls (11-14 years), 371 young women (20-34 years, postpartum within 2 weeks) and 333 postmenopausal women (50-70 years).

RESULTS

After adjustment for potential covariates, analysis of covariance showed a significantly positive association between fruit intake and BMD and BMC in all participants combined (P-trend: < 0.001 to 0.002). BMD Z-score increased by 0.25 (or 2.1 % of the mean), 0.22 (3.5 %), 0.23 (3.0 %) and 0.25 (3.5 %), and BMC Z-score increased by 0.33 (5.7 %), 0.25 (5.8 %), 0.34 (5.9 %) and 0.29 (4.7 %), at the total body, lumbar spine, total hip and femoral neck in participants belonging to the top tertile compared with the bottom tertile of fruit intake (all P < 0.05), respectively. There was no significant association between vegetable intake and bone mass at all bone sites studied except for total body BMD (P = 0.030). Relatively more pronounced effects were observed in boys and postmenopausal women.

CONCLUSION

Our findings add to the existing evidence that fruits and vegetables may have a bone sparing effect.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Medical Statistics & Epidemiology, Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Food, Nutrition and Health, School of Public Health, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510080, People's Republic of China.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22717072

Citation

Li, Jing-Jing, et al. "Fruit and Vegetable Intake and Bone Mass in Chinese Adolescents, Young and Postmenopausal Women." Public Health Nutrition, vol. 16, no. 1, 2013, pp. 78-86.
Li JJ, Huang ZW, Wang RQ, et al. Fruit and vegetable intake and bone mass in Chinese adolescents, young and postmenopausal women. Public Health Nutr. 2013;16(1):78-86.
Li, J. J., Huang, Z. W., Wang, R. Q., Ma, X. M., Zhang, Z. Q., Liu, Z., ... Su, Y. X. (2013). Fruit and vegetable intake and bone mass in Chinese adolescents, young and postmenopausal women. Public Health Nutrition, 16(1), pp. 78-86. doi:10.1017/S1368980012001127.
Li JJ, et al. Fruit and Vegetable Intake and Bone Mass in Chinese Adolescents, Young and Postmenopausal Women. Public Health Nutr. 2013;16(1):78-86. PubMed PMID: 22717072.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Fruit and vegetable intake and bone mass in Chinese adolescents, young and postmenopausal women. AU - Li,Jing-Jing, AU - Huang,Zhen-Wu, AU - Wang,Ruo-Qin, AU - Ma,Xiao-Ming, AU - Zhang,Zhe-Qing, AU - Liu,Zen, AU - Chen,Yu-Ming, AU - Su,Yi-Xiang, Y1 - 2012/04/17/ PY - 2012/6/22/entrez PY - 2012/6/22/pubmed PY - 2013/7/3/medline SP - 78 EP - 86 JF - Public health nutrition JO - Public Health Nutr VL - 16 IS - 1 N2 - OBJECTIVE: Previous studies showed an inconsistent association of fruit and vegetable consumption with bone health. We assessed the associations in Chinese adolescents, young and postmenopausal women. DESIGN: A cross-sectional study conducted in China during July 2009 to May 2010. SETTING: Bone mineral density (BMD) and content (BMC) at the whole body, lumbar spine and left hip were measured with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Dietary intakes were assessed using an FFQ. All these values were separately standardized into Z-scores in each population subgroup. SUBJECTS: One hundred and ten boys and 112 girls (11-14 years), 371 young women (20-34 years, postpartum within 2 weeks) and 333 postmenopausal women (50-70 years). RESULTS: After adjustment for potential covariates, analysis of covariance showed a significantly positive association between fruit intake and BMD and BMC in all participants combined (P-trend: < 0.001 to 0.002). BMD Z-score increased by 0.25 (or 2.1 % of the mean), 0.22 (3.5 %), 0.23 (3.0 %) and 0.25 (3.5 %), and BMC Z-score increased by 0.33 (5.7 %), 0.25 (5.8 %), 0.34 (5.9 %) and 0.29 (4.7 %), at the total body, lumbar spine, total hip and femoral neck in participants belonging to the top tertile compared with the bottom tertile of fruit intake (all P < 0.05), respectively. There was no significant association between vegetable intake and bone mass at all bone sites studied except for total body BMD (P = 0.030). Relatively more pronounced effects were observed in boys and postmenopausal women. CONCLUSION: Our findings add to the existing evidence that fruits and vegetables may have a bone sparing effect. SN - 1475-2727 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22717072/Fruit_and_vegetable_intake_and_bone_mass_in_Chinese_adolescents_young_and_postmenopausal_women_ L2 - https://www.cambridge.org/core/product/identifier/S1368980012001127/type/journal_article DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -