Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Beyond malnutrition screening: appropriate methods to guide nutrition care for aged care residents.
J Acad Nutr Diet 2012; 112(3):376-81JA

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Malnutrition is common in older adults and early and appropriate nutrition intervention can lead to positive quality of life and health outcomes.

OBJECTIVE

The purpose of our study was to determine the concurrent validity of several malnutrition screening tools and anthropometric parameters against validated nutrition assessment tools in the long-term-care setting.

STUDY DESIGN

This work was a cross-sectional, observational study.

PARTICIPANTS/SETTING

Older adults (aged >55 years) from two long-term-care facilities were screened.

MAIN OUTCOMES

Nutrition screening tools used included the Malnutrition Screening Tool (MST), Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool (MUST), Mini Nutritional Assessment-Short Form (MNA-SF), and the Simplified Nutritional Assessment Questionnaire. Nutritional status was assessed by Subjective Global Assessment (SGA), Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA), body mass index (BMI), corrected arm muscle area, and calf circumference. Residents were rated as either well nourished or malnourished according to each nutrition assessment tool.

STATISTICAL ANALYSIS

A contingency table was used to determine the sensitivity and specificity of the nutrition screening tools and objective measures in detecting patients at risk of malnutrition compared with the SGA and MNA.

RESULTS

One hundred twenty-seven residents (31.5% men; mean age 82.7 ± 9 years, 57.5% high care) consented. According to SGA, 27.6% (n=31) of residents were malnourished and 13.4% were rated as malnourished by MNA. MST had the best sensitivity and specificity compared with the SGA (sensitivity 88.6%, specificity 93.5%, ?=0.806), followed by MNA-SF (85.7%, 62%, ?=0.377), MUST (68.6%, 96.7%, ?=0.703), and Simplified Nutritional Assessment Questionnaire (45.7%, 77.2%, ?=0.225). Compared with MNA, MNA-SF had the highest sensitivity of 100%, but specificity was 56.4% (?=0.257). MST compared with MNA had a sensitivity of 94.1%, specificity 80.9% (?=0.501). The anthropometric screens ranged from ?=0.193 to 0.468 when compared with SGA and MNA.

CONCLUSIONS

MST, MUST, MNA-SF, and the anthropometric screens corrected arm muscle area and calf circumference have acceptable concurrent validity compared with validated nutrition assessment tools and can be used to triage nutrition care in the long-term-care setting.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Princess Alexandra Hospital, Australia. e.isenring@uq.edu.auNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Validation Studies

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22717197

Citation

Isenring, Elisabeth A., et al. "Beyond Malnutrition Screening: Appropriate Methods to Guide Nutrition Care for Aged Care Residents." Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, vol. 112, no. 3, 2012, pp. 376-81.
Isenring EA, Banks M, Ferguson M, et al. Beyond malnutrition screening: appropriate methods to guide nutrition care for aged care residents. J Acad Nutr Diet. 2012;112(3):376-81.
Isenring, E. A., Banks, M., Ferguson, M., & Bauer, J. D. (2012). Beyond malnutrition screening: appropriate methods to guide nutrition care for aged care residents. Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, 112(3), pp. 376-81. doi:10.1016/j.jada.2011.09.038.
Isenring EA, et al. Beyond Malnutrition Screening: Appropriate Methods to Guide Nutrition Care for Aged Care Residents. J Acad Nutr Diet. 2012;112(3):376-81. PubMed PMID: 22717197.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Beyond malnutrition screening: appropriate methods to guide nutrition care for aged care residents. AU - Isenring,Elisabeth A, AU - Banks,Merrilyn, AU - Ferguson,Maree, AU - Bauer,Judith D, Y1 - 2012/03/01/ PY - 2011/06/02/received PY - 2011/09/06/accepted PY - 2012/6/22/entrez PY - 2012/6/22/pubmed PY - 2012/8/21/medline SP - 376 EP - 81 JF - Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics JO - J Acad Nutr Diet VL - 112 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND: Malnutrition is common in older adults and early and appropriate nutrition intervention can lead to positive quality of life and health outcomes. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of our study was to determine the concurrent validity of several malnutrition screening tools and anthropometric parameters against validated nutrition assessment tools in the long-term-care setting. STUDY DESIGN: This work was a cross-sectional, observational study. PARTICIPANTS/SETTING: Older adults (aged >55 years) from two long-term-care facilities were screened. MAIN OUTCOMES: Nutrition screening tools used included the Malnutrition Screening Tool (MST), Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool (MUST), Mini Nutritional Assessment-Short Form (MNA-SF), and the Simplified Nutritional Assessment Questionnaire. Nutritional status was assessed by Subjective Global Assessment (SGA), Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA), body mass index (BMI), corrected arm muscle area, and calf circumference. Residents were rated as either well nourished or malnourished according to each nutrition assessment tool. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS: A contingency table was used to determine the sensitivity and specificity of the nutrition screening tools and objective measures in detecting patients at risk of malnutrition compared with the SGA and MNA. RESULTS: One hundred twenty-seven residents (31.5% men; mean age 82.7 ± 9 years, 57.5% high care) consented. According to SGA, 27.6% (n=31) of residents were malnourished and 13.4% were rated as malnourished by MNA. MST had the best sensitivity and specificity compared with the SGA (sensitivity 88.6%, specificity 93.5%, ?=0.806), followed by MNA-SF (85.7%, 62%, ?=0.377), MUST (68.6%, 96.7%, ?=0.703), and Simplified Nutritional Assessment Questionnaire (45.7%, 77.2%, ?=0.225). Compared with MNA, MNA-SF had the highest sensitivity of 100%, but specificity was 56.4% (?=0.257). MST compared with MNA had a sensitivity of 94.1%, specificity 80.9% (?=0.501). The anthropometric screens ranged from ?=0.193 to 0.468 when compared with SGA and MNA. CONCLUSIONS: MST, MUST, MNA-SF, and the anthropometric screens corrected arm muscle area and calf circumference have acceptable concurrent validity compared with validated nutrition assessment tools and can be used to triage nutrition care in the long-term-care setting. SN - 2212-2672 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22717197/Beyond_malnutrition_screening:_appropriate_methods_to_guide_nutrition_care_for_aged_care_residents_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0002-8223(11)01666-X DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -