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Implantable insulin pumps: a major piece of computerized diabetes therapy.
Horm Metab Res Suppl. 1990; 24:144-54.HM

Abstract

There is a significant need for revised, safe and more effective insulin delivery methods than subcutaneous insulin therapy, including CSII, in the treatment of type 1 diabetes. The aim of the review is to describe the current status, issues and prospects of insulin therapy with implantable insulin pumps. The International Registry of Human Implantation reports that, as of May 1988, 249 pumps have been implanted, using the intravenous or intraperitoneal route for insulin infusion. The data suggest a reasonable safety of the method, no pump run-away having been reported and only one patient having died of severe hypoglycemia possibly related to the pump. The more recent European (POINT) and U.S. (PIMS) trials with programmable pumps have confirmed the safety and suggested a better efficacy of the method over subcutaneous insulin administration. They also have pointed out that in order to represent an acceptable alternative to existing methods, implantable pumps still have to a) cope with or increase catheter longevity, presently of 2-3 years only, namely by improving catheter biocompatibility and b) clearly prove its superiority over subcutaneous methods at controlling diabetes, using large-scale, randomized, prospective controlled studies.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Medicine, University of California, Irvine.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

2272620

Citation

Selam, J L.. "Implantable Insulin Pumps: a Major Piece of Computerized Diabetes Therapy." Hormone and Metabolic Research. Supplement Series, vol. 24, 1990, pp. 144-54.
Selam JL. Implantable insulin pumps: a major piece of computerized diabetes therapy. Horm Metab Res Suppl. 1990;24:144-54.
Selam, J. L. (1990). Implantable insulin pumps: a major piece of computerized diabetes therapy. Hormone and Metabolic Research. Supplement Series, 24, 144-54.
Selam JL. Implantable Insulin Pumps: a Major Piece of Computerized Diabetes Therapy. Horm Metab Res Suppl. 1990;24:144-54. PubMed PMID: 2272620.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Implantable insulin pumps: a major piece of computerized diabetes therapy. A1 - Selam,J L, PY - 1990/1/1/pubmed PY - 1990/1/1/medline PY - 1990/1/1/entrez SP - 144 EP - 54 JF - Hormone and metabolic research. Supplement series JO - Horm Metab Res Suppl VL - 24 N2 - There is a significant need for revised, safe and more effective insulin delivery methods than subcutaneous insulin therapy, including CSII, in the treatment of type 1 diabetes. The aim of the review is to describe the current status, issues and prospects of insulin therapy with implantable insulin pumps. The International Registry of Human Implantation reports that, as of May 1988, 249 pumps have been implanted, using the intravenous or intraperitoneal route for insulin infusion. The data suggest a reasonable safety of the method, no pump run-away having been reported and only one patient having died of severe hypoglycemia possibly related to the pump. The more recent European (POINT) and U.S. (PIMS) trials with programmable pumps have confirmed the safety and suggested a better efficacy of the method over subcutaneous insulin administration. They also have pointed out that in order to represent an acceptable alternative to existing methods, implantable pumps still have to a) cope with or increase catheter longevity, presently of 2-3 years only, namely by improving catheter biocompatibility and b) clearly prove its superiority over subcutaneous methods at controlling diabetes, using large-scale, randomized, prospective controlled studies. SN - 0170-5903 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/2272620/Implantable_insulin_pumps:_a_major_piece_of_computerized_diabetes_therapy_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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