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Fatal childhood injuries in Finland, 1971-2010.
Inj Prev. 2013 Jun; 19(3):171-6.IP

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Childhood injuries are a major public health problem worldwide, injuries being the leading cause of death and disability from early childhood through adolescence.

OBJECTIVE

To examine the 40-year nationwide trends in the number and incidence of fatal injuries among children aged 0-14 years in Finland, a country with a white European population of 5.3 million.

METHODS

Data were obtained from the Official Cause-of-Death Statistics of Finland during 1971-2010. The main categories for unintentional injury deaths were road traffic injury, water traffic injury, falls, drowning and poisoning. For intentional injury deaths, the main categories were suicide and homicide.

RESULTS

In 1971, there were 109 fatal injuries involving girls and 207 involving boys, and in 2010, these numbers were 10 and 16. The corresponding incidence rates (per 100 000 children per year) were 20.1 and 2.3 (girls), and 36.7 and 3.5 (boys). The reduction in fatal injuries was mostly due to fewer unintentional injuries. The greatest decline occurred in the number of fatal motor vehicle injuries: from 57 (girls) and 92 (boys) in 1971 to 5 (girls) and 2 (boys) in 2010. Drownings followed a similar pattern. Violence-related deaths also showed a decreasing trend. In 1971, there were 14 intentional deaths in girls and 15 in boys, while in 2010 these numbers were 0 and 3, respectively.

CONCLUSIONS

This nationwide study confirms a decline in childhood injury deaths over the last four decades, with the greatest declines occurring in the number of fatal motor vehicle injuries, drownings and intentional injuries.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Tampere Research Centre of Sports Medicine, UKK Institute for Health Promotion Research, Tampere, Finland. jari.parkkari@uta.fiNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22729165

Citation

Parkkari, Jari, et al. "Fatal Childhood Injuries in Finland, 1971-2010." Injury Prevention : Journal of the International Society for Child and Adolescent Injury Prevention, vol. 19, no. 3, 2013, pp. 171-6.
Parkkari J, Mattila V, Kivistö J, et al. Fatal childhood injuries in Finland, 1971-2010. Inj Prev. 2013;19(3):171-6.
Parkkari, J., Mattila, V., Kivistö, J., Niemi, S., Palvanen, M., & Kannus, P. (2013). Fatal childhood injuries in Finland, 1971-2010. Injury Prevention : Journal of the International Society for Child and Adolescent Injury Prevention, 19(3), 171-6. https://doi.org/10.1136/injuryprev-2012-040387
Parkkari J, et al. Fatal Childhood Injuries in Finland, 1971-2010. Inj Prev. 2013;19(3):171-6. PubMed PMID: 22729165.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Fatal childhood injuries in Finland, 1971-2010. AU - Parkkari,Jari, AU - Mattila,Ville, AU - Kivistö,Juho, AU - Niemi,Seppo, AU - Palvanen,Mika, AU - Kannus,Pekka, Y1 - 2012/06/23/ PY - 2012/6/26/entrez PY - 2012/6/26/pubmed PY - 2013/12/16/medline KW - Fatal injury KW - child KW - children KW - elderly KW - epidemiology KW - falls KW - home KW - longitudinal KW - methodology KW - populations/contexts KW - prevention KW - sports KW - sports/leisure facility KW - time trend KW - youth SP - 171 EP - 6 JF - Injury prevention : journal of the International Society for Child and Adolescent Injury Prevention JO - Inj Prev VL - 19 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND: Childhood injuries are a major public health problem worldwide, injuries being the leading cause of death and disability from early childhood through adolescence. OBJECTIVE: To examine the 40-year nationwide trends in the number and incidence of fatal injuries among children aged 0-14 years in Finland, a country with a white European population of 5.3 million. METHODS: Data were obtained from the Official Cause-of-Death Statistics of Finland during 1971-2010. The main categories for unintentional injury deaths were road traffic injury, water traffic injury, falls, drowning and poisoning. For intentional injury deaths, the main categories were suicide and homicide. RESULTS: In 1971, there were 109 fatal injuries involving girls and 207 involving boys, and in 2010, these numbers were 10 and 16. The corresponding incidence rates (per 100 000 children per year) were 20.1 and 2.3 (girls), and 36.7 and 3.5 (boys). The reduction in fatal injuries was mostly due to fewer unintentional injuries. The greatest decline occurred in the number of fatal motor vehicle injuries: from 57 (girls) and 92 (boys) in 1971 to 5 (girls) and 2 (boys) in 2010. Drownings followed a similar pattern. Violence-related deaths also showed a decreasing trend. In 1971, there were 14 intentional deaths in girls and 15 in boys, while in 2010 these numbers were 0 and 3, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: This nationwide study confirms a decline in childhood injury deaths over the last four decades, with the greatest declines occurring in the number of fatal motor vehicle injuries, drownings and intentional injuries. SN - 1475-5785 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22729165/Fatal_childhood_injuries_in_Finland_1971_2010_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -