Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Television viewing, television content, food intake, physical activity and body mass index: a cross-sectional study of preschool children aged 2-6 years.
Health Promot J Austr 2012; 23(1):58-62HP

Abstract

ISSUE ADDRESSED

The mechanisms underlying the relationship between television (TV) viewing and weight status in preschool aged children are not well understood. This study aimed to explore the relationships between preschool children's TV viewing habits (i.e. time spent viewing, content watched and foods eaten while viewing), daily food intake, general physical activity levels and their body mass index (BMI).

METHOD

A cross-sectional sample of preschool children in Melbourne (n = 135). Mothers of preschoolers completed a 3-day TV diary; information was collected on viewing time, content and food consumed while watching TV. Mothers also reported their child's height, weight and physical activity behaviour. Associations between study and outcome variables were determined by bivariate correlations and hierarchical regression analyses.

RESULTS

Mean age of preschoolers was 4.5 years and 14% were overweight or obese. The mean daily time spent watching TV was 90.7 minutes (SD 50.7) A small, positive correlation was found between viewing TV on weekdays and child BMIz, (p<0.05). This effect was moderate when controlled for total kilojoules consumed while watching TV (on weekdays) and number of minutes spent in sedentary activities (across three days).

CONCLUSIONS

This study suggests that TV viewing may affect preschool child weight status through displacement of physical activity or eating while viewing.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Psychology, Deakin University, Victoria.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22730942

Citation

Cox, Rachael, et al. "Television Viewing, Television Content, Food Intake, Physical Activity and Body Mass Index: a Cross-sectional Study of Preschool Children Aged 2-6 Years." Health Promotion Journal of Australia : Official Journal of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals, vol. 23, no. 1, 2012, pp. 58-62.
Cox R, Skouteris H, Rutherford L, et al. Television viewing, television content, food intake, physical activity and body mass index: a cross-sectional study of preschool children aged 2-6 years. Health Promot J Austr. 2012;23(1):58-62.
Cox, R., Skouteris, H., Rutherford, L., Fuller-Tyszkiewicz, M., Dell' Aquila, D., & Hardy, L. L. (2012). Television viewing, television content, food intake, physical activity and body mass index: a cross-sectional study of preschool children aged 2-6 years. Health Promotion Journal of Australia : Official Journal of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals, 23(1), pp. 58-62.
Cox R, et al. Television Viewing, Television Content, Food Intake, Physical Activity and Body Mass Index: a Cross-sectional Study of Preschool Children Aged 2-6 Years. Health Promot J Austr. 2012;23(1):58-62. PubMed PMID: 22730942.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Television viewing, television content, food intake, physical activity and body mass index: a cross-sectional study of preschool children aged 2-6 years. AU - Cox,Rachael, AU - Skouteris,Helen, AU - Rutherford,Leonie, AU - Fuller-Tyszkiewicz,Matthew, AU - Dell' Aquila,Daniela, AU - Hardy,Louise L, PY - 2012/6/27/entrez PY - 2012/6/27/pubmed PY - 2012/8/1/medline SP - 58 EP - 62 JF - Health promotion journal of Australia : official journal of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals JO - Health Promot J Austr VL - 23 IS - 1 N2 - ISSUE ADDRESSED: The mechanisms underlying the relationship between television (TV) viewing and weight status in preschool aged children are not well understood. This study aimed to explore the relationships between preschool children's TV viewing habits (i.e. time spent viewing, content watched and foods eaten while viewing), daily food intake, general physical activity levels and their body mass index (BMI). METHOD: A cross-sectional sample of preschool children in Melbourne (n = 135). Mothers of preschoolers completed a 3-day TV diary; information was collected on viewing time, content and food consumed while watching TV. Mothers also reported their child's height, weight and physical activity behaviour. Associations between study and outcome variables were determined by bivariate correlations and hierarchical regression analyses. RESULTS: Mean age of preschoolers was 4.5 years and 14% were overweight or obese. The mean daily time spent watching TV was 90.7 minutes (SD 50.7) A small, positive correlation was found between viewing TV on weekdays and child BMIz, (p<0.05). This effect was moderate when controlled for total kilojoules consumed while watching TV (on weekdays) and number of minutes spent in sedentary activities (across three days). CONCLUSIONS: This study suggests that TV viewing may affect preschool child weight status through displacement of physical activity or eating while viewing. SN - 1036-1073 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22730942/Television_viewing_television_content_food_intake_physical_activity_and_body_mass_index:_a_cross_sectional_study_of_preschool_children_aged_2_6_years_ L2 - https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/resolve/openurl?genre=article&amp;sid=nlm:pubmed&amp;issn=1036-1073&amp;date=2012&amp;volume=23&amp;issue=1&amp;spage=58 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -