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Evaluation of an operant successive negative contrast task as a method to study affective state in rodents.
Behav Brain Res. 2012 Oct 01; 234(2):155-60.BB

Abstract

Successive negative contrast (SNC) describes a change in an animal's behaviour following a downshift in the quantitative or qualitative value of a reward. Previous studies suggest both consummatory and instrumental paradigms have the potential to provide an objective measure of affective state in rodents. We first investigated whether an SNC effect is observed in an operant task based on the 5 choice serial reaction time task. We then tested whether this SNC effect was sensitive to differences in affective state induced by manipulating the home cage environment. In animals trained to receive a four pellet food reward, reinforcer downshift to a single reward pellet induced a significant slowing of both correct response and collection latencies to levels below that of animals which had only ever received the lower value reward, indicating a SNC effect. Home cage environmental enrichment resulted in a paradoxical effect on responses in this SNC task where animals housed in a barren environment showed faster baseline response times and the SNC effect was significantly attenuated. These data suggest that the animals housed in the barren conditions were in a more positive affective and/or motivational state during testing than animals housed in enriched cages. Although opposite to the effects of housing conditions in a runway SNC task, these data could be explained by the enriching effects of daily training in an operant task. Rather than inducing a negative affective state in rats, the barren housing conditions resulted in a relatively more positive affective state in the chamber when compared to animals living in a highly enriched environment.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Physiology and Pharmacology, University of Bristol, Medical Sciences Building, University Walk, Bristol BS8 1TD, United Kingdom.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22732261

Citation

Mitchell, Emma N., et al. "Evaluation of an Operant Successive Negative Contrast Task as a Method to Study Affective State in Rodents." Behavioural Brain Research, vol. 234, no. 2, 2012, pp. 155-60.
Mitchell EN, Marston HM, Nutt DJ, et al. Evaluation of an operant successive negative contrast task as a method to study affective state in rodents. Behav Brain Res. 2012;234(2):155-60.
Mitchell, E. N., Marston, H. M., Nutt, D. J., & Robinson, E. S. (2012). Evaluation of an operant successive negative contrast task as a method to study affective state in rodents. Behavioural Brain Research, 234(2), 155-60. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.bbr.2012.06.016
Mitchell EN, et al. Evaluation of an Operant Successive Negative Contrast Task as a Method to Study Affective State in Rodents. Behav Brain Res. 2012 Oct 1;234(2):155-60. PubMed PMID: 22732261.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Evaluation of an operant successive negative contrast task as a method to study affective state in rodents. AU - Mitchell,Emma N, AU - Marston,Hugh M, AU - Nutt,David J, AU - Robinson,Emma S J, Y1 - 2012/06/23/ PY - 2012/03/02/received PY - 2012/06/11/revised PY - 2012/06/15/accepted PY - 2012/6/27/entrez PY - 2012/6/27/pubmed PY - 2013/1/23/medline SP - 155 EP - 60 JF - Behavioural brain research JO - Behav Brain Res VL - 234 IS - 2 N2 - Successive negative contrast (SNC) describes a change in an animal's behaviour following a downshift in the quantitative or qualitative value of a reward. Previous studies suggest both consummatory and instrumental paradigms have the potential to provide an objective measure of affective state in rodents. We first investigated whether an SNC effect is observed in an operant task based on the 5 choice serial reaction time task. We then tested whether this SNC effect was sensitive to differences in affective state induced by manipulating the home cage environment. In animals trained to receive a four pellet food reward, reinforcer downshift to a single reward pellet induced a significant slowing of both correct response and collection latencies to levels below that of animals which had only ever received the lower value reward, indicating a SNC effect. Home cage environmental enrichment resulted in a paradoxical effect on responses in this SNC task where animals housed in a barren environment showed faster baseline response times and the SNC effect was significantly attenuated. These data suggest that the animals housed in the barren conditions were in a more positive affective and/or motivational state during testing than animals housed in enriched cages. Although opposite to the effects of housing conditions in a runway SNC task, these data could be explained by the enriching effects of daily training in an operant task. Rather than inducing a negative affective state in rats, the barren housing conditions resulted in a relatively more positive affective state in the chamber when compared to animals living in a highly enriched environment. SN - 1872-7549 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22732261/Evaluation_of_an_operant_successive_negative_contrast_task_as_a_method_to_study_affective_state_in_rodents_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0166-4328(12)00429-9 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -