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Complementary and alternative medicine in children: an analysis of the recent literature.
Curr Opin Pediatr 2012; 24(4):539-46CO

Abstract

PURPOSE OF REVIEW

Although many publications have documented the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in children and adolescents, most have lacked the scientific rigor to establish clear benefits over so-called conventional medicine. We reviewed the literature published in the past year to identify the types of CAM most often studied in children, the variety of conditions to which these modalities are applied, and the methodologies used in the articles exploring the most prevalent CAM modalities.

RECENT FINDINGS

We identified 111 published articles on CAM use in children in 2011. The most common modalities were herbal/dietary supplements, acupuncture, massage, chiropractic, and homeopathy. The most commonly studied conditions were pain, headache, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), asthma, and colic. Although a majority of the articles consisted of reviews, case reports, and other nonhypothesis-driven methodologies, we did find that several were randomized controlled trials, meta-analyses, or systematic reviews. These methodologies, however, rarely accounted for the majority of publications on a particular therapy or condition.

SUMMARY

The use of CAM in children continues to occupy a niche area of interest for many providers and families, but only a minority of articles published in the past year utilized methods of sufficient rigor to provide a useful comparison to more conventional therapies.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Baystate Children's Hospital, Tufts University School of Medicine, Springfield, Massachusetts, USA. john.snyder@bhs.orgNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22732637

Citation

Snyder, John, and Patrick Brown. "Complementary and Alternative Medicine in Children: an Analysis of the Recent Literature." Current Opinion in Pediatrics, vol. 24, no. 4, 2012, pp. 539-46.
Snyder J, Brown P. Complementary and alternative medicine in children: an analysis of the recent literature. Curr Opin Pediatr. 2012;24(4):539-46.
Snyder, J., & Brown, P. (2012). Complementary and alternative medicine in children: an analysis of the recent literature. Current Opinion in Pediatrics, 24(4), pp. 539-46. doi:10.1097/MOP.0b013e328355a214.
Snyder J, Brown P. Complementary and Alternative Medicine in Children: an Analysis of the Recent Literature. Curr Opin Pediatr. 2012;24(4):539-46. PubMed PMID: 22732637.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Complementary and alternative medicine in children: an analysis of the recent literature. AU - Snyder,John, AU - Brown,Patrick, PY - 2012/6/27/entrez PY - 2012/6/27/pubmed PY - 2012/12/10/medline SP - 539 EP - 46 JF - Current opinion in pediatrics JO - Curr. Opin. Pediatr. VL - 24 IS - 4 N2 - PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Although many publications have documented the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in children and adolescents, most have lacked the scientific rigor to establish clear benefits over so-called conventional medicine. We reviewed the literature published in the past year to identify the types of CAM most often studied in children, the variety of conditions to which these modalities are applied, and the methodologies used in the articles exploring the most prevalent CAM modalities. RECENT FINDINGS: We identified 111 published articles on CAM use in children in 2011. The most common modalities were herbal/dietary supplements, acupuncture, massage, chiropractic, and homeopathy. The most commonly studied conditions were pain, headache, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), asthma, and colic. Although a majority of the articles consisted of reviews, case reports, and other nonhypothesis-driven methodologies, we did find that several were randomized controlled trials, meta-analyses, or systematic reviews. These methodologies, however, rarely accounted for the majority of publications on a particular therapy or condition. SUMMARY: The use of CAM in children continues to occupy a niche area of interest for many providers and families, but only a minority of articles published in the past year utilized methods of sufficient rigor to provide a useful comparison to more conventional therapies. SN - 1531-698X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22732637/Complementary_and_alternative_medicine_in_children:_an_analysis_of_the_recent_literature_ L2 - http://Insights.ovid.com/pubmed?pmid=22732637 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -