Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Bullying and victimization among Turkish children and adolescents: examining prevalence and associated health symptoms.
Eur J Pediatr 2012; 171(10):1549-57EJ

Abstract

Over the past decade, concerns about bullying and its effects on school health have grown. However, few studies in Turkey have examined the prevalence of bullying in childhood and adolescence and its association with health problems. The current study aimed to examine the prevalence and manifestation of bullying and victimization among male and female students aged 11-15 years. A second goal was to examine the physical and psychological symptoms associated with being a bully, victim and both a bully and a victim ('bully-victim'). Participants were 1,315 students from grades 5, 7, and 9, selected from three schools in Western Turkey. Twenty percent of the students were found to be involved in the cycle of bullying (5 % as a bully, 8 % as a victim, and 7 % as bully-victims). Bullies (although not victims) were found to show decreased levels of school satisfaction and school attendance. Being a victim or a bully-victim was associated with a significantly increased risk of experiencing a wide range of physical and psychological health symptoms (victims OR, 1.67-3.38; p < 0.01; bully-victims OR, 2.13-3.15; p < 0.01). Being a bully, in contrast, was associated with high levels of irritability (OR, 2.82; p < 0.01), but no other health concerns. Children that were bullies and victims were almost as vulnerable to health symptoms as children that were purely victims.

CONCLUSION

These findings contribute to a better understanding of bullying in Turkish schools, emphasizing the negative effects of bullying involvement on health and well-being.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Child Study Center, Yale University, 40 Temple Street, Suite 6B, New Haven, CT 06510-2715, USA. sevda.arslan@yale.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22735980

Citation

Arslan, Sevda, et al. "Bullying and Victimization Among Turkish Children and Adolescents: Examining Prevalence and Associated Health Symptoms." European Journal of Pediatrics, vol. 171, no. 10, 2012, pp. 1549-57.
Arslan S, Hallett V, Akkas E, et al. Bullying and victimization among Turkish children and adolescents: examining prevalence and associated health symptoms. Eur J Pediatr. 2012;171(10):1549-57.
Arslan, S., Hallett, V., Akkas, E., & Akkas, O. A. (2012). Bullying and victimization among Turkish children and adolescents: examining prevalence and associated health symptoms. European Journal of Pediatrics, 171(10), pp. 1549-57.
Arslan S, et al. Bullying and Victimization Among Turkish Children and Adolescents: Examining Prevalence and Associated Health Symptoms. Eur J Pediatr. 2012;171(10):1549-57. PubMed PMID: 22735980.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Bullying and victimization among Turkish children and adolescents: examining prevalence and associated health symptoms. AU - Arslan,Sevda, AU - Hallett,Victoria, AU - Akkas,Esref, AU - Akkas,Ozlem Altinbas, Y1 - 2012/06/27/ PY - 2012/03/06/received PY - 2012/06/12/accepted PY - 2012/6/28/entrez PY - 2012/6/28/pubmed PY - 2013/2/28/medline SP - 1549 EP - 57 JF - European journal of pediatrics JO - Eur. J. Pediatr. VL - 171 IS - 10 N2 - UNLABELLED: Over the past decade, concerns about bullying and its effects on school health have grown. However, few studies in Turkey have examined the prevalence of bullying in childhood and adolescence and its association with health problems. The current study aimed to examine the prevalence and manifestation of bullying and victimization among male and female students aged 11-15 years. A second goal was to examine the physical and psychological symptoms associated with being a bully, victim and both a bully and a victim ('bully-victim'). Participants were 1,315 students from grades 5, 7, and 9, selected from three schools in Western Turkey. Twenty percent of the students were found to be involved in the cycle of bullying (5 % as a bully, 8 % as a victim, and 7 % as bully-victims). Bullies (although not victims) were found to show decreased levels of school satisfaction and school attendance. Being a victim or a bully-victim was associated with a significantly increased risk of experiencing a wide range of physical and psychological health symptoms (victims OR, 1.67-3.38; p < 0.01; bully-victims OR, 2.13-3.15; p < 0.01). Being a bully, in contrast, was associated with high levels of irritability (OR, 2.82; p < 0.01), but no other health concerns. Children that were bullies and victims were almost as vulnerable to health symptoms as children that were purely victims. CONCLUSION: These findings contribute to a better understanding of bullying in Turkish schools, emphasizing the negative effects of bullying involvement on health and well-being. SN - 1432-1076 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22735980/Bullying_and_victimization_among_Turkish_children_and_adolescents:_examining_prevalence_and_associated_health_symptoms_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00431-012-1782-9 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -