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Drug use patterns in young adulthood and post-college employment.
Drug Alcohol Depend 2013; 127(1-3):23-30DA

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The relationship between serious drug involvement and risk for unemployment is well recognized, but few studies have prospectively examined this relationship among college students. This study used longitudinal data to examine the association between drug use patterns during college and the likelihood of employment post-college, holding constant sociodemographic variables and personality characteristics. Second, we estimate the prevalence of alcohol and other drug use disorders among employed individuals.

METHODS

Data were derived from the College Life Study. Participants entered college as traditional students and were assessed annually for six years, regardless of continued college attendance. Analyses were restricted to 620 individuals no longer enrolled in school by Year 6.

RESULTS

Using multinomial regression modeling, persistent drug users (i.e., used illicit drugs (other than marijuana) and/or nonmedical prescription drugs every year they were assessed during the first four years of study) were significantly more likely than non-users to be unemployed vs. employed full-time post-college. Persistent drug users and infrequent marijuana users were also more likely than non-users to be unemployed vs. employed part-time. In Year 6, 13.2% of individuals employed full-time and 23.7% of individuals employed part-time met DSM-IV criteria for drug abuse or dependence during the past year.

CONCLUSIONS

If confirmed, the results of this study suggest that persistent drug use among academically achieving young adults might increase risk for post-college unemployment. More research is needed to understand the processes underlying this association. Further attention should be directed at managing substance use problems among recent college graduates who have secured employment.

Authors+Show Affiliations

University of Maryland, School of Public Health, Center on Young Adult Health and Development, Department of Family Science, College Park, MD 20742, United States. aarria@umd.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22743161

Citation

Arria, Amelia M., et al. "Drug Use Patterns in Young Adulthood and Post-college Employment." Drug and Alcohol Dependence, vol. 127, no. 1-3, 2013, pp. 23-30.
Arria AM, Garnier-Dykstra LM, Cook ET, et al. Drug use patterns in young adulthood and post-college employment. Drug Alcohol Depend. 2013;127(1-3):23-30.
Arria, A. M., Garnier-Dykstra, L. M., Cook, E. T., Caldeira, K. M., Vincent, K. B., Baron, R. A., & O'Grady, K. E. (2013). Drug use patterns in young adulthood and post-college employment. Drug and Alcohol Dependence, 127(1-3), pp. 23-30. doi:10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2012.06.001.
Arria AM, et al. Drug Use Patterns in Young Adulthood and Post-college Employment. Drug Alcohol Depend. 2013 Jan 1;127(1-3):23-30. PubMed PMID: 22743161.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Drug use patterns in young adulthood and post-college employment. AU - Arria,Amelia M, AU - Garnier-Dykstra,Laura M, AU - Cook,Emily T, AU - Caldeira,Kimberly M, AU - Vincent,Kathryn B, AU - Baron,Rebecca A, AU - O'Grady,Kevin E, Y1 - 2012/06/27/ PY - 2011/09/12/received PY - 2012/05/22/revised PY - 2012/06/02/accepted PY - 2012/6/30/entrez PY - 2012/6/30/pubmed PY - 2013/9/21/medline SP - 23 EP - 30 JF - Drug and alcohol dependence JO - Drug Alcohol Depend VL - 127 IS - 1-3 N2 - BACKGROUND: The relationship between serious drug involvement and risk for unemployment is well recognized, but few studies have prospectively examined this relationship among college students. This study used longitudinal data to examine the association between drug use patterns during college and the likelihood of employment post-college, holding constant sociodemographic variables and personality characteristics. Second, we estimate the prevalence of alcohol and other drug use disorders among employed individuals. METHODS: Data were derived from the College Life Study. Participants entered college as traditional students and were assessed annually for six years, regardless of continued college attendance. Analyses were restricted to 620 individuals no longer enrolled in school by Year 6. RESULTS: Using multinomial regression modeling, persistent drug users (i.e., used illicit drugs (other than marijuana) and/or nonmedical prescription drugs every year they were assessed during the first four years of study) were significantly more likely than non-users to be unemployed vs. employed full-time post-college. Persistent drug users and infrequent marijuana users were also more likely than non-users to be unemployed vs. employed part-time. In Year 6, 13.2% of individuals employed full-time and 23.7% of individuals employed part-time met DSM-IV criteria for drug abuse or dependence during the past year. CONCLUSIONS: If confirmed, the results of this study suggest that persistent drug use among academically achieving young adults might increase risk for post-college unemployment. More research is needed to understand the processes underlying this association. Further attention should be directed at managing substance use problems among recent college graduates who have secured employment. SN - 1879-0046 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22743161/Drug_use_patterns_in_young_adulthood_and_post_college_employment_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0376-8716(12)00217-7 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -