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Top food sources contributing to vitamin D intake and the association of ready-to-eat cereal and breakfast consumption habits to vitamin D intake in Canadians and United States Americans.
J Food Sci. 2012 Aug; 77(8):H170-5.JF

Abstract

This study aimed to determine dietary vitamin D intake of U.S. Americans and Canadians and contributions of food sources to total vitamin D intake. Total of 7- or 14-d food intake data were analyzed for vitamin D by a proprietary nutrient assessment methodology that utilized food intake data from the Natl. Eating Trends(®) service, portion size data from NHANES 1999-2004, and nutrient values using the Univ. of Minnesota's Nutrition Data System for Research software. Study participants were 7837 U.S. Americans and 4025 Canadians, ≥2-y-old males and females. The main outcome measures were total dietary vitamin D intake, percent contribution of foods to total vitamin D intake, and vitamin D intake by cereal and breakfast consumption habits. ANOVA was used to determine differences in means or proportions by age and gender and according to breakfast consumption habits. Mean vitamin D intake ranged from 152 to 220 IU/d. Less than 2% of participants in all age groups from the United States and Canada met the 2011 Recommended Daily Allowance (RDA) for vitamin D from foods. Milk, meat, and fish were the top food sources for vitamin D for both Americans and Canadians. Ready-to-eat (RTE) cereal was a top 10 source of vitamin D for Americans but not Canadians. Vitamin D intake was higher with more frequent RTE cereal and breakfast consumption in both countries, largely attributable to greater milk intake.

PRACTICAL APPLICATION

Most U.S. Americans and Canadians do not meet the 2011 Inst. of Medicine recommended daily allowance (RDA) for vitamin D for their age groups from foods. Increasing breakfast and cereal consumption may be a useful strategy to increase dietary vitamin D intake to help individuals meet the RDA for vitamin D, particularly by increasing milk intake. However, it is likely that additional food fortification or vitamin D supplementation is required to achieve the RDA.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Indiana University School of Medicine, Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Indianapolis, IN 46202, USA. katmhill@iupui.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22747906

Citation

Hill, Kathleen M., et al. "Top Food Sources Contributing to Vitamin D Intake and the Association of Ready-to-eat Cereal and Breakfast Consumption Habits to Vitamin D Intake in Canadians and United States Americans." Journal of Food Science, vol. 77, no. 8, 2012, pp. H170-5.
Hill KM, Jonnalagadda SS, Albertson AM, et al. Top food sources contributing to vitamin D intake and the association of ready-to-eat cereal and breakfast consumption habits to vitamin D intake in Canadians and United States Americans. J Food Sci. 2012;77(8):H170-5.
Hill, K. M., Jonnalagadda, S. S., Albertson, A. M., Joshi, N. A., & Weaver, C. M. (2012). Top food sources contributing to vitamin D intake and the association of ready-to-eat cereal and breakfast consumption habits to vitamin D intake in Canadians and United States Americans. Journal of Food Science, 77(8), H170-5. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1750-3841.2012.02787.x
Hill KM, et al. Top Food Sources Contributing to Vitamin D Intake and the Association of Ready-to-eat Cereal and Breakfast Consumption Habits to Vitamin D Intake in Canadians and United States Americans. J Food Sci. 2012;77(8):H170-5. PubMed PMID: 22747906.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Top food sources contributing to vitamin D intake and the association of ready-to-eat cereal and breakfast consumption habits to vitamin D intake in Canadians and United States Americans. AU - Hill,Kathleen M, AU - Jonnalagadda,Satya S, AU - Albertson,Ann M, AU - Joshi,Nandan A, AU - Weaver,Connie M, Y1 - 2012/07/02/ PY - 2012/7/4/entrez PY - 2012/7/4/pubmed PY - 2012/12/12/medline SP - H170 EP - 5 JF - Journal of food science JO - J Food Sci VL - 77 IS - 8 N2 - UNLABELLED: This study aimed to determine dietary vitamin D intake of U.S. Americans and Canadians and contributions of food sources to total vitamin D intake. Total of 7- or 14-d food intake data were analyzed for vitamin D by a proprietary nutrient assessment methodology that utilized food intake data from the Natl. Eating Trends(®) service, portion size data from NHANES 1999-2004, and nutrient values using the Univ. of Minnesota's Nutrition Data System for Research software. Study participants were 7837 U.S. Americans and 4025 Canadians, ≥2-y-old males and females. The main outcome measures were total dietary vitamin D intake, percent contribution of foods to total vitamin D intake, and vitamin D intake by cereal and breakfast consumption habits. ANOVA was used to determine differences in means or proportions by age and gender and according to breakfast consumption habits. Mean vitamin D intake ranged from 152 to 220 IU/d. Less than 2% of participants in all age groups from the United States and Canada met the 2011 Recommended Daily Allowance (RDA) for vitamin D from foods. Milk, meat, and fish were the top food sources for vitamin D for both Americans and Canadians. Ready-to-eat (RTE) cereal was a top 10 source of vitamin D for Americans but not Canadians. Vitamin D intake was higher with more frequent RTE cereal and breakfast consumption in both countries, largely attributable to greater milk intake. PRACTICAL APPLICATION: Most U.S. Americans and Canadians do not meet the 2011 Inst. of Medicine recommended daily allowance (RDA) for vitamin D for their age groups from foods. Increasing breakfast and cereal consumption may be a useful strategy to increase dietary vitamin D intake to help individuals meet the RDA for vitamin D, particularly by increasing milk intake. However, it is likely that additional food fortification or vitamin D supplementation is required to achieve the RDA. SN - 1750-3841 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22747906/Top_food_sources_contributing_to_vitamin_D_intake_and_the_association_of_ready_to_eat_cereal_and_breakfast_consumption_habits_to_vitamin_D_intake_in_Canadians_and_United_States_Americans_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1750-3841.2012.02787.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -