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Environmental factors and risk of developing paediatric inflammatory bowel disease -- a population based study 2007-2009.
J Crohns Colitis 2013; 7(1):79-88JC

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND AIMS

To identify environmental risk factors for developing inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in children <15 years of age.

METHODS

IBD patients and randomly selected healthy controls from a well defined geographical area in Denmark were prospectively recruited in the period 1.1.2007-31.12.2009. Data regarding socioeconomic status, area of residence, living conditions, infections and diet were obtained by a questionnaire.

RESULTS

A total of 118 IBD patients (59 Crohn's disease (CD), 56 ulcerative colitis (UC) and 3 IBD unclassified (IBDU)) and 477 healthy controls filled out the questionnaire. The response rates were 91% in patients and 45% in controls, respectively. Several risk factors for IBD were identified: IBD in first degree relatives (IBD: OR (odds ratio): 6.1 (95%CI: 2.5-15.0), CD (OR: 6.8 (2.3-20.2)) and UC (OR: 6.1 (2.3-16.0))); bedroom sharing (IBD: OR: 2.1 (1.0-4.3), CD (OR: 3.6 (1.3-9.4))); high sugar intake (IBD: OR: 2.5 (1.0-6.2), CD (OR: 2.9 (1.0-8.5))); prior admission to a hospital for gastrointestinal infections (IBD: 7.7 (3.1-19.1), CD (7.9 (2.5-24.9)) and UC (7.4 (2.5-21.6))); stressful events (IBD: 1.7 (1.0-2.9)). Protective factors were daily vs. less than daily vegetable consumption (CD: 0.3 (0.1-1.0), UC (0.3 (0.1-0.8))) and whole meal bread consumption (IBD: OR: 0.5 (0.3-0.9), CD (0.4 (0.2-0.9))). An increased risk of diagnosis of CD compared to UC was shown for patients living in more urban areas (OR: 1.3 (1.1-1.6)).

CONCLUSION

We identified several risk and protective factors for developing IBD. Studies on the influence of environmental factors are important in our understanding of aetiology and phenotypes of paediatric IBD.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Paediatrics, Copenhagen University Hospital, Hvidovre, Denmark. Christian.jakobsen@hvh.regionh.dk

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22748696

Citation

Jakobsen, Christian, et al. "Environmental Factors and Risk of Developing Paediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease -- a Population Based Study 2007-2009." Journal of Crohn's & Colitis, vol. 7, no. 1, 2013, pp. 79-88.
Jakobsen C, Paerregaard A, Munkholm P, et al. Environmental factors and risk of developing paediatric inflammatory bowel disease -- a population based study 2007-2009. J Crohns Colitis. 2013;7(1):79-88.
Jakobsen, C., Paerregaard, A., Munkholm, P., & Wewer, V. (2013). Environmental factors and risk of developing paediatric inflammatory bowel disease -- a population based study 2007-2009. Journal of Crohn's & Colitis, 7(1), pp. 79-88. doi:10.1016/j.crohns.2012.05.024.
Jakobsen C, et al. Environmental Factors and Risk of Developing Paediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease -- a Population Based Study 2007-2009. J Crohns Colitis. 2013;7(1):79-88. PubMed PMID: 22748696.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Environmental factors and risk of developing paediatric inflammatory bowel disease -- a population based study 2007-2009. AU - Jakobsen,Christian, AU - Paerregaard,Anders, AU - Munkholm,Pia, AU - Wewer,Vibeke, Y1 - 2012/06/29/ PY - 2012/02/16/received PY - 2012/04/24/revised PY - 2012/05/31/accepted PY - 2012/7/4/entrez PY - 2012/7/4/pubmed PY - 2013/7/9/medline SP - 79 EP - 88 JF - Journal of Crohn's & colitis JO - J Crohns Colitis VL - 7 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND AND AIMS: To identify environmental risk factors for developing inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in children <15 years of age. METHODS: IBD patients and randomly selected healthy controls from a well defined geographical area in Denmark were prospectively recruited in the period 1.1.2007-31.12.2009. Data regarding socioeconomic status, area of residence, living conditions, infections and diet were obtained by a questionnaire. RESULTS: A total of 118 IBD patients (59 Crohn's disease (CD), 56 ulcerative colitis (UC) and 3 IBD unclassified (IBDU)) and 477 healthy controls filled out the questionnaire. The response rates were 91% in patients and 45% in controls, respectively. Several risk factors for IBD were identified: IBD in first degree relatives (IBD: OR (odds ratio): 6.1 (95%CI: 2.5-15.0), CD (OR: 6.8 (2.3-20.2)) and UC (OR: 6.1 (2.3-16.0))); bedroom sharing (IBD: OR: 2.1 (1.0-4.3), CD (OR: 3.6 (1.3-9.4))); high sugar intake (IBD: OR: 2.5 (1.0-6.2), CD (OR: 2.9 (1.0-8.5))); prior admission to a hospital for gastrointestinal infections (IBD: 7.7 (3.1-19.1), CD (7.9 (2.5-24.9)) and UC (7.4 (2.5-21.6))); stressful events (IBD: 1.7 (1.0-2.9)). Protective factors were daily vs. less than daily vegetable consumption (CD: 0.3 (0.1-1.0), UC (0.3 (0.1-0.8))) and whole meal bread consumption (IBD: OR: 0.5 (0.3-0.9), CD (0.4 (0.2-0.9))). An increased risk of diagnosis of CD compared to UC was shown for patients living in more urban areas (OR: 1.3 (1.1-1.6)). CONCLUSION: We identified several risk and protective factors for developing IBD. Studies on the influence of environmental factors are important in our understanding of aetiology and phenotypes of paediatric IBD. SN - 1876-4479 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22748696/Environmental_factors_and_risk_of_developing_paediatric_inflammatory_bowel_disease____a_population_based_study_2007_2009_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1873-9946(12)00266-8 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -