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The epidemiology of idiopathic acute pancreatitis, analysis of the nationwide inpatient sample from 1998 to 2007.
Pancreas 2013; 42(1):1-5P

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

The study aimed to better define the epidemiology of idiopathic acute pancreatitis (IAP).

METHODS

We identified admissions with primary diagnosis of acute pancreatitis (AP) in Nationwide Inpatient Sample between 1998 and 2007. Idiopathic AP was defined as all cases after excluding International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, codes for other causes of AP (including biliary, alcoholic, trauma, iatrogenic, hyperparathyroidism, hyperlipidemia, etc).

RESULTS

Among the primary admissions for AP, 26.9% had biliary pancreatitis, 25.1% alcoholic, and 36.5% idiopathic. Idiopathic AP had estimated 81,8025 admissions with a mean hospitalization of 5.6 days. Patients with IAP accounted for almost half of the fatalities among the cases of AP (48.2%) and had a higher mortality rate than both patients with biliary pancreatitis and patients with alcoholic pancreatitis (1.9%, 1.5%, and 1.0%, respectively, P < 0.01). Forty-six percent of patients with biliary pancreatitis underwent cholecystectomy during the index hospitalization, compared with 0.42% of patients with IAP. Patients with IAP had a demographic distribution similar to that of patients with biliary AP (female predominant and older), which was distinct from patients with alcoholic pancreatitis (male predominant and younger). There was a gradual but steady decrease in the incidence of IAP, from 41% in 1998 to 30% in 2007.

CONCLUSIONS

Despite improving diagnostics, IAP remains a common clinical problem with a significant mortality. Standardization of the clinical management of these patients warrants further investigation.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Surgery, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, CA 94305-5641, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22750972

Citation

Chen, Yijun, et al. "The Epidemiology of Idiopathic Acute Pancreatitis, Analysis of the Nationwide Inpatient Sample From 1998 to 2007." Pancreas, vol. 42, no. 1, 2013, pp. 1-5.
Chen Y, Zak Y, Hernandez-Boussard T, et al. The epidemiology of idiopathic acute pancreatitis, analysis of the nationwide inpatient sample from 1998 to 2007. Pancreas. 2013;42(1):1-5.
Chen, Y., Zak, Y., Hernandez-Boussard, T., Park, W., & Visser, B. C. (2013). The epidemiology of idiopathic acute pancreatitis, analysis of the nationwide inpatient sample from 1998 to 2007. Pancreas, 42(1), pp. 1-5. doi:10.1097/MPA.0b013e3182572d3a.
Chen Y, et al. The Epidemiology of Idiopathic Acute Pancreatitis, Analysis of the Nationwide Inpatient Sample From 1998 to 2007. Pancreas. 2013;42(1):1-5. PubMed PMID: 22750972.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The epidemiology of idiopathic acute pancreatitis, analysis of the nationwide inpatient sample from 1998 to 2007. AU - Chen,Yijun, AU - Zak,Yulia, AU - Hernandez-Boussard,Tina, AU - Park,Walter, AU - Visser,Brendan C, PY - 2012/7/4/entrez PY - 2012/7/4/pubmed PY - 2013/5/31/medline SP - 1 EP - 5 JF - Pancreas JO - Pancreas VL - 42 IS - 1 N2 - OBJECTIVE: The study aimed to better define the epidemiology of idiopathic acute pancreatitis (IAP). METHODS: We identified admissions with primary diagnosis of acute pancreatitis (AP) in Nationwide Inpatient Sample between 1998 and 2007. Idiopathic AP was defined as all cases after excluding International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, codes for other causes of AP (including biliary, alcoholic, trauma, iatrogenic, hyperparathyroidism, hyperlipidemia, etc). RESULTS: Among the primary admissions for AP, 26.9% had biliary pancreatitis, 25.1% alcoholic, and 36.5% idiopathic. Idiopathic AP had estimated 81,8025 admissions with a mean hospitalization of 5.6 days. Patients with IAP accounted for almost half of the fatalities among the cases of AP (48.2%) and had a higher mortality rate than both patients with biliary pancreatitis and patients with alcoholic pancreatitis (1.9%, 1.5%, and 1.0%, respectively, P < 0.01). Forty-six percent of patients with biliary pancreatitis underwent cholecystectomy during the index hospitalization, compared with 0.42% of patients with IAP. Patients with IAP had a demographic distribution similar to that of patients with biliary AP (female predominant and older), which was distinct from patients with alcoholic pancreatitis (male predominant and younger). There was a gradual but steady decrease in the incidence of IAP, from 41% in 1998 to 30% in 2007. CONCLUSIONS: Despite improving diagnostics, IAP remains a common clinical problem with a significant mortality. Standardization of the clinical management of these patients warrants further investigation. SN - 1536-4828 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22750972/The_epidemiology_of_idiopathic_acute_pancreatitis_analysis_of_the_nationwide_inpatient_sample_from_1998_to_2007_ L2 - http://Insights.ovid.com/pubmed?pmid=22750972 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -