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Dietary intake of saturated fat by food source and incident cardiovascular disease: the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis.
Am J Clin Nutr. 2012 Aug; 96(2):397-404.AJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Although dietary recommendations have focused on restricting saturated fat (SF) consumption to reduce cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk, evidence from prospective studies has not supported a strong link between total SF intake and CVD events. An understanding of whether food sources of SF influence these relations may provide new insights.

OBJECTIVE

We investigated the association of SF consumption from different food sources and the incidence of CVD events in a multiethnic population.

DESIGN

Participants who were 45-84 y old at baseline (n = 5209) were followed from 2000 to 2010. Diet was assessed by using a 120-item food-frequency questionnaire. CVD incidence (316 cases) was assessed during follow-up visits.

RESULTS

After adjustment for demographics, lifestyle, and dietary confounders, a higher intake of dairy SF was associated with lower CVD risk [HR (95% CI) for +5 g/d and +5% of energy from dairy SF: 0.79 (0.68, 0.92) and 0.62 (0.47, 0.82), respectively]. In contrast, a higher intake of meat SF was associated with greater CVD risk [HR (95% CI) for +5 g/d and a +5% of energy from meat SF: 1.26 (1.02, 1.54) and 1.48 (0.98, 2.23), respectively]. The substitution of 2% of energy from meat SF with energy from dairy SF was associated with a 25% lower CVD risk [HR (95% CI): 0.75 (0.63, 0.91)]. No associations were observed between plant or butter SF and CVD risk, but ranges of intakes were narrow.

CONCLUSION

Associations of SF with health may depend on food-specific fatty acids or other nutrient constituents in foods that contain SF, in addition to SF.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Epidemiology, Human Genetics and Environmental Sciences, The University of Texas School of Public Health, Houston, USA. motto@hsph.harvard.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22760560

Citation

de Oliveira Otto, Marcia C., et al. "Dietary Intake of Saturated Fat By Food Source and Incident Cardiovascular Disease: the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis." The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 96, no. 2, 2012, pp. 397-404.
de Oliveira Otto MC, Mozaffarian D, Kromhout D, et al. Dietary intake of saturated fat by food source and incident cardiovascular disease: the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis. Am J Clin Nutr. 2012;96(2):397-404.
de Oliveira Otto, M. C., Mozaffarian, D., Kromhout, D., Bertoni, A. G., Sibley, C. T., Jacobs, D. R., & Nettleton, J. A. (2012). Dietary intake of saturated fat by food source and incident cardiovascular disease: the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 96(2), 397-404. https://doi.org/10.3945/ajcn.112.037770
de Oliveira Otto MC, et al. Dietary Intake of Saturated Fat By Food Source and Incident Cardiovascular Disease: the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis. Am J Clin Nutr. 2012;96(2):397-404. PubMed PMID: 22760560.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Dietary intake of saturated fat by food source and incident cardiovascular disease: the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis. AU - de Oliveira Otto,Marcia C, AU - Mozaffarian,Dariush, AU - Kromhout,Daan, AU - Bertoni,Alain G, AU - Sibley,Christopher T, AU - Jacobs,David R,Jr AU - Nettleton,Jennifer A, Y1 - 2012/07/03/ PY - 2012/7/5/entrez PY - 2012/7/5/pubmed PY - 2012/10/2/medline SP - 397 EP - 404 JF - The American journal of clinical nutrition JO - Am J Clin Nutr VL - 96 IS - 2 N2 - BACKGROUND: Although dietary recommendations have focused on restricting saturated fat (SF) consumption to reduce cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk, evidence from prospective studies has not supported a strong link between total SF intake and CVD events. An understanding of whether food sources of SF influence these relations may provide new insights. OBJECTIVE: We investigated the association of SF consumption from different food sources and the incidence of CVD events in a multiethnic population. DESIGN: Participants who were 45-84 y old at baseline (n = 5209) were followed from 2000 to 2010. Diet was assessed by using a 120-item food-frequency questionnaire. CVD incidence (316 cases) was assessed during follow-up visits. RESULTS: After adjustment for demographics, lifestyle, and dietary confounders, a higher intake of dairy SF was associated with lower CVD risk [HR (95% CI) for +5 g/d and +5% of energy from dairy SF: 0.79 (0.68, 0.92) and 0.62 (0.47, 0.82), respectively]. In contrast, a higher intake of meat SF was associated with greater CVD risk [HR (95% CI) for +5 g/d and a +5% of energy from meat SF: 1.26 (1.02, 1.54) and 1.48 (0.98, 2.23), respectively]. The substitution of 2% of energy from meat SF with energy from dairy SF was associated with a 25% lower CVD risk [HR (95% CI): 0.75 (0.63, 0.91)]. No associations were observed between plant or butter SF and CVD risk, but ranges of intakes were narrow. CONCLUSION: Associations of SF with health may depend on food-specific fatty acids or other nutrient constituents in foods that contain SF, in addition to SF. SN - 1938-3207 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22760560/Dietary_intake_of_saturated_fat_by_food_source_and_incident_cardiovascular_disease:_the_Multi_Ethnic_Study_of_Atherosclerosis_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article-lookup/doi/10.3945/ajcn.112.037770 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -